Curriculum Guide 2021-2022

Dear Terre Haute North Students and Parents

We strive to make North the very best it can possibly be.  Teachers, counselors, deans, staff, and administrators work diligently to provide a safe and highly effective learning atmosphere.  We encourage families to sit down and work together selecting the classes for next year.  These decisions will directly determine future plans.  Don’t hesitate contacting counselors with questions about classes or scheduling.  Explore this curriculum guide to make the best decisions for your student.

The Curriculum Guide is created to assist you and your parents in designing a course of study for your high school career.  It is important to read thoroughly all the Curriculum Guide to make wise decisions.  The high school experience sets the foundation for your life’s work/career in adulthood.  The course selections you make are serious steps toward building a successful future.  Decisions should be made with the help of parents, teachers, and counselors.  Once course selections are made, each student is encouraged to make a commitment to succeed in each class.

You are planning for your future.  Make careful and serious choices to ensure your path to success.

Take care,
Steve Joseph

Terre Haute North Vigo Mission Statement

The Terre Haute North Vigo High School community is committed to providing a secure haven for learning.  We strive to empower and to challenge all students to become educated, ethical, responsible citizens in a diverse, ever-changing world.

Terre Haute North Vigo Vision Statement

Not for School but for Life – NON SCHOLAE SED VITAE

Terre Haute North Vigo High School will prepare students to embrace life-long learning.

  • Our students will be led by a team composed of educators, families, and community leaders.  Together we will set high expectations for students in a safe environment that makes success possible.
  • Our students will be equipped with the knowledge about future possibilities that will allow them to make productive and ethical choices.
  • Our students will be well informed about opportunities in the community and will understand the importance of taking advantage of them.  Before graduating, students will be introduced to service-learning experiences and encouraged to volunteer for the benefit of their community.

Terre Haute North Vigo High School strives to be a positive contributing member of the community by graduating young people prepared to continue their education, to volunteer their time and talents, and to be employed across the diverse landscape of Terre Haute, Vigo County, the state of Indiana, the United States, and the world.

 

*High School Diploma for Freshman Class of 2023 and later must follow the Graduation Pathways standards.

 

Graduation Pathways

Students in the class of 2023 and later must satisfy at least one option from each of the three requirements in order to graduate. Students graduating prior to 2023 may satisfy graduation requirements by completing Graduation Pathways, though this opportunity must be reviewed with their high school counselors.

Graduation Requirements Graduation Pathway Options

1) High School Diploma

(Students must complete the course requirements of one of the following designations.)

  • Core 40 designation
  • Academic Honors designation
  • Technical Honors designation
  • General designation

2) Learn and Demonstrate Employability Skills

(Students must complete at least one of the following.)

  • Project -Based Learning Experience
  • Service- Based Learning Experience
  • Work- Based Learning Experience

3) Postsecondary-Ready Competencies

(Students must complete at least one of the following.)

  • Honors Designation: Fulfill all requirements of either the Academic or Technical Honors designation.
  • ACT : College-ready benchmarks -Currently 18 in English, 22 in Reading, 22 in Math, and 23 in Science; students must meet at least 2 of the 4 score requirements, either the 18 in English or 22 in Reading AND either the 22 in Math or 23 in Science.
  • SAT:  College-ready benchmarks -Currently 480 in Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (ERW) and 530 in Math; students must meet the individual scores in each subject.
  • ASVAB: Earn at least a minimum AFQT score of 31.
  • State and Industry-recognized Credential or Certification
  • Federally recognized Apprenticeship
  • Career-Technical Education Concentrator: Must earn a C average in at least two non-duplicative advanced courses (courses beyond an introductory course) within a particular program or program of study.
  • AP/Dual Credit or CLEP Exams: Must earn a C average or higher in at least three (3) courses. If a student is taking AP/Dual Credit courses to meet the postsecondary-ready competency, either:

1.       One of the three courses must be in a core content area. The Core Transfer Library defines “core content” for dual credit/AP requirement. Students pursuing liberal arts tracks must have at least one course corresponding with the CTL.  OR

2.       All three (3) courses must be part of a defined CTE sequence. A defined CTE sequence of courses is based on the Indiana College and Career Pathways. These courses must correspond with the CTE Technical Dual Credit Crosswalk.

 

Employability Skills

Demonstrations of employability skills include experiences that enable students to apply essential academic, technical, and professional skills and find engagement and relevancy in their academic careers. Through a Project-based, Service-based, or Work-based learning experience, students must demonstrate the Department of Workforce Development’s Employability Skills Benchmarks. The development of the student product must satisfy the categories of employability skills:  Mindsets, Self-Management Skills, Learning Strategies, Social Skills, and Workplace Skills.

Project-based learning (PBL) allows students to gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. The project is framed by a meaningful problem to solve or a question to answer, at the appropriate level of challenge. Students engage in a rigorous, extended process of asking questions, finding resources, and applying information. Students often make their project work public by explaining, displaying and/or presenting it to people beyond the classroom. PBL can be demonstrated through a number of different projects and experiences. Those projects, however, must meet design principles: Challenging Problems or Questions, Sustained Inquiry, Authenticity, Student Voice and Choice, Reflection, Critique and Revision, and Public Product.

Service-based learning (SBL) integrates meaningful service to enrich and apply academic knowledge, teach civic and personal responsibility, and strengthen communities. SBL can be classified by three core indicators: Integrating academic study with service experience; Reflecting on larger social, economic, and societal issues; and Collaborating efforts among students, schools, and community partners. Students can use SBL to demonstrate their employability skills through numerous activities and service opportunities. Those opportunities must meet design principles: Meaningful Service, Link to Curriculum, Reflection, Diversity, Youth Voice, Partnerships, Progress Monitoring, Duration and Intensity

Work-based learning (WBL) is a strategy to reinforce academic, technical, and social skills learned in the classroom through collaborative activities with employer partners. Work-based learning experiences allow students to apply classroom theories to practical problems, to explore career options, and to pursue personal and professional goals. Four design principles design and identify WBL programs: Clear Work-Based Learning Partnership Agreement and Plan; Authentic Work Experience Component; Structured Learning Component; and Culminating Assessment and Recognition of Skills.

 Questions about the new Graduation Pathways should be directed to your student’s high school counselor.

 

Planning Your High School Courses at Terre Haute North Vigo High School

Included in this student planning book are the following:  a description of graduation requirements, information about the diploma options, grading policies, a discussion of guidance and counseling services, and other data necessary to make informed decisions.  A listing of electives and a description of all courses offered at Terre Haute North Vigo High School are also included for your benefit.  Being informed about course offerings and prerequisites will help avoid making mistakes in the planning process.  The four-year graduation plan for high school is vitally important in the planning process.

The school year is divided into two terms.  The terms are 18 weeks in length.  Students participate in seven 45-minute classes daily.  This allows students to earn seven credits per term and 14 credits yearly.

Changing a Student’s Schedule

A student’s schedule should be the result of careful planning and consideration by the student, his/her parents, teachers, and the counselor.  Every student is encouraged to discuss his/her schedule with the counselor in an individual session as the selection of courses for the following year is made.  The school orders supplies, texts, and equipment based on those student selections; therefore, no schedule changes will be allowed except under the special circumstances described below.

In a rare event that a change becomes necessary during a term, changes in a student’s schedule will be made only after consultation with the student’s teacher, parent or guardian, and counselor. After the end of one week, dropping a class is recorded as “WF”, zero credit, which has the same effect on the Grade Point Average as a failure; dropping a course requires the teacher, counselor, and parent or guardian’s approval.

Final student schedules are updated in Skyward in June.  Students may not change classes because they do not want a particular teacher.  Changes requested after the last day of school in June may be made for the following reasons if scheduling permits:  1) An error in the schedule; 2) The student has failed a class; 3) The student has not had the prerequisites; 4) The student wishes to expunge a grade of C- or lower; 5) The student has earned a grade of C- or lower in the previous class; 6) The student is scheduled with the same teacher the student has previously failed 7) To schedule more difficult classes.  All schedule changes must meet one of these criteria.

Semester Requirements:

To be graduated from high school, a pupil shall be a full-time student in grades 9 through 12 and have attended at least ten (7) terms (semesters).

Minimum Course Load
All students must be enrolled in classes a minimum of six periods.  It is strongly recommended that all students be enrolled in classes seven periods.Demonstrated Competency in Basic Skills:

Students who cannot demonstrate competency in the basic skills, as identified by the school corporation and the State of Indiana, necessary for future learning shall not be graduated from a high school certified by the Indiana Department of Education.

Early Graduates

Only students who have met all of the graduation requirements by having all of their credits and having met the graduation pathway requirements are allowed to leave after the first semester.  Students must apply for early graduation 19 weeks before the desired graduation date.

College and Career Counseling Services

The Counseling Department speaks to all students, presenting information about course curriculum.  We ask that students talk with their parents to decide their course work for the following year based upon abilities, interests, and college/career goals.  Students are given the opportunity to thoroughly discuss their college/career goals with their counselors.  All students and parents have the chance to review their proposed schedules before they are finalized.  The finalized schedule should be selected carefully, as course changes are not permitted.

The Counseling Department is equipped to assist students with course and career planning.  There are numerous resources such as individual counseling, small group counseling, career assessment programs, written information, interest inventories, career files, classroom programs, and technical school/college preparation guides to assist students with the college and career decision-making process.  Students are also encouraged to fully utilize the counseling website as a helpful resource throughout their high school years. Counselors work with students and parents to develop an awareness of how student interests, aptitudes, and abilities work together.  Students are encouraged to communicate with their counselors on a frequent basis to assure that their high school course programs continue to prepare them for college and career readiness.

Special Education Services

Services are provided for students with disabilities.  An individual education plan for each student is developed each year based on the student’s current level of functioning; annual goals are formulated with objectives developed to meet the goals.  Students with disabilities are integrated into all aspects of the school program that are appropriate to meeting their individual goals and objectives.  Integration is designed to maximize student success.  Collaboration among teachers is a strategy that is used in a number of disciplines.

 Release of Information Forms

By federal law, North High School is not permitted to release information regarding students without permission of the student’s legal guardian if the student is under 18 years of age or permission of the student if 18 years-old or older.  Many times parents request that information regarding students’ grades be released to insurance companies to receive “good student” discounts, potential employers request information regarding students, and colleges require grades and class information for students applying to their institutions.  In order to comply with these requests, the school must have a properly signed release of information form on file.  These forms may be obtained in the Counseling Office.  The registrar maintains the file of these forms.

Parent/Teacher Conferences

Many times parents may want to discuss a student’s progress in a particular class with the student’s teacher.  Counselors are responsible for setting up parent/teacher conferences for the counselees.  Parents should call the counselor at 462-4318 to arrange a conference at a time that is agreeable to all parties or they may email individual teachers and counselors.  The counselors email addresses are available on the school website at:  https://web.vigoschools.org/terre-haute-north/

Assignments for Absentees

When students have been absent for three days, the parent or student may call the counseling office at 462-4312 to make arrangements. Allow at least 24 hours between request for homework and the time when the assignments and textbooks may be picked up from the counseling office.  If the student is going to be absent for less than three days, it is suggested that the student contact classmates for assignments.  All teachers may also be reached through e-mail or Canvas.  Faculty email addresses can be found on the North High School website.

INFORMATION REGARDING GRADING POLICIES

Term Grades

Only the term grades are recorded on a student’s permanent record.  Credits are based on the student’s term grades.  Students receive no credit for an “F” – “WF” – “N for Audit” on a term grade.

Term grades are based on the grades earned during the two nine-week grading periods and the term exam.  The term exam accounts for 20% of the term grade.  Term exams are given in each class during the final week of each term.  Teachers may override the averaging of grades and base the term grade on teacher-determined criteria.  The following numerical values are assigned to term letter grades and are used in computing cumulative grade point averages:

A =4.00                       B =3.00                       C =2.00                       D =1.00

A-=3.67                       B-=2.67                       C-=1.67                       D-=0.67

B+=3.33                      C+=2.33                      D+=1.33                      F =0.00

Grade Point Average

The cumulative grade point average is computed at the end of each term and is based on the term grades beginning with the ninth grade.  The total number of grade points earned is divided by the total number of credits attempted.

Rank in Class

Rank in class is based on the cumulative grade point average and is computed at the end of each term.  Cumulative grade point averages for students in a given class are placed in order from high to low with the highest Grade Point Average given the rank of 1 and the lowest Grade Point Average given the rank equal to the number of students in that class.  A student’s class rank is determined by where his/ her Grade Point Average falls in the ranking.  Students to be included in the class ranking will have earned at least half of their credits at an accredited high school.  Foreign exchange students will not earn a class ranking.  Students with a pass on their mark history cannot be included in rank.  A student who may be eligible to earn the Valedictorian or Salutatorian designation should work closely with his/ her counselor to ensure a full schedule of classes at the school is taken each semester.  Taking courses off site or not for credit can impact the Valedictorian or Salutatorian designation. 

Honor Roll

At the close of each grading period, an Honor Roll for each grade level is prepared and published.  Honor Roll eligibility is based on grades in all credit subjects.  The student must be enrolled in a minimum of five classes.  A student must maintain a 3.00 average to qualify for the honor roll with no grade of D, D+, D-, F, or I (incomplete).  The following grade point averages determine the Honor Roll classification:

3.85 – 4.00     Exceptional Honor Roll

3.50 – 3.84     High Honor Roll

3.00 – 3.49     Regular Honor Roll

Repeating a Course for Improved Grade

If seating in the classroom is available, a student may petition through his/her counselor for the opportunity to repeat any course in which the student has earned a semester grade of “C-” or less and have placed on the permanent transcript the higher grade earned.  The lower grade will be expunged from the record.  Additional credit will not be accumulated through this process.  A student who has received a grade of “F” in a required course must repeat that course and the “F” grade will be expunged when a higher grade is earned.

GRADING POLICIES REGARDING EXTRACURRICULAR PARTICIPATION

Student-Athletes

To participate in a competitive sport, a student must have parental consent, a medical examination, and have a minimum of five passing grades in full-credit courses during the previous grading period. The student must maintain passing grades in five full-credit courses to continue participation. The required Basic Physical Education course counts as one of the five required classes. All North student-athletes must be enrolled in at least five full-credit classes. Any student-athlete who may be considering playing in a NCAA Division I or II athletic program in college should be aware of the required high school curriculum and required college admission scores necessary to be qualified to participate; athletes should check with their counselors to be sure they are meeting the standards. Enclosed in this guide are the College Freshman Eligibility Standards for NCAA Divisions I and II.

Student Officers

All students who wish to run for a class office or for Student Council must also be passing in at least five full-credit classes from the previous grading period and have at least a 2.5 cumulative grade point average. Elections are held in the spring for current students to elect the leaders for the subsequent sophomore, junior, and senior classes. Incoming freshmen hold elections for class officers in the fall.

Queens, Queen’s Court, and Escorts

All participants in coronation including the Queen, attendants, and escorts must have a minimum 2.0 GPA, be passing in a minimum of five classes, and be full-time students. They must also meet behavioral requirements.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT/COLLEGE CHALLENGE/DUAL CREDIT

Advanced Placement Courses

The Advanced Placement Program, a cooperative educational endeavor, is based on the fact that many young people can complete college-level studies in secondary schools.  Participating colleges, in turn, grant credit and appropriate placement to students who have done well on the AP Examinations which are administered in May.  Tests are administered in strict compliance with the College Entrance Examination Board through the Educational Testing Service.

In May of each year, students may take the Advanced Placement examinations. Students who score a 3, 4, or 5 on a test may receive college credit. Tests are given in 19 different subject areas. The science, math, and English tests require only a small registration fee, while all other tests require both a registration and test fee.  Based upon financial guidelines, students may receive financial assistance regarding the test fee.  Please see a counselor for more details.

Students have the opportunity of registering for Advanced Placement Exams in the following subjects:

Biology Environmental Science Psychology
Calculus AB French Spanish
Calculus BC Government Statistics
Chemistry Macro Economics U.S. History
English Language and Composition Micro Economics World History
English Literature and Composition Music Theory
European History Physics

College Challenge Program

Selected courses from Indiana State University are offered to Terre Haute North Vigo students.  These college-level courses are taught by our high school teachers who have been approved by the University’s appropriate academic department and are considered adjunct ISU faculty members.

Any class taken in the College Challenge Program will be arranged within the student’s regular daily school schedule.  Students are not required to attend class outside of school hours to participate in College Challenge.  Courses which have laboratory components must be taken together.

The College Challenge Program is intended for juniors and seniors who have attained a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher.  Students in this category will find the classes to be especially beneficial.  Classes offered are open to a variety of students as long as they have the capability and desire to do the work.  Students are required to pay a $25 per credit hour charge; classes are generally three or four college credits.  Based upon financial guidelines, students may receive financial assistance and take the course for free.

Potential College Challenge courses offered at Terre Haute North Vigo include:

  • Advanced Composition CC (ENG 105)
  • Advanced Speech CC (COMM 101)
  • Chemistry CC (CHEM 103/103L, CHEM 104/104L)
  • Chemistry CC (CHEM 105/105L, CHEM 106/106L)
  • Human Anatomy & Physiology IA CC (ATTR 210/210L/PE220/220L)
  • Macro Economics CC (ECON 200)
  • Micro Economics CC (ECON 201)
  • Music History & Appreciation CC (MUS 236)
  • AP Physics 1 CC (PHYSICS 105/105L)
  • AP Physics 2 CC (PHYS106, PHYS106L)
  • PreCalculus or PreCalculus A (MATH 115)
  • Trigonometry or Trigonometry A (MATH 112)
  • US History CC (Hist 201/202)
  • Statistics CC (Stats 241)

Dual Credit Opportunities

Dual credit opportunities allow high school students to earn college and high school credits at the same time.  Terre Haute North has an agreement with Ivy Tech State College which allows students to enroll in some Business, Computer, Foreign Language, Medical, and Technology courses for dual credit.  Students who complete these courses may earn college credit at no cost to the student.  These credits transfer to many programs at ISU and other universities across the state.  Please consult with your counselor for the latest information.

TESTING

Guidance Services Testing Program

The testing program at North Vigo High School consists of a number of tests that serve different purposes with regard to college.  Counselors assist students in identifying which tests should be taken.

ILEARN Grade 9 Assessments Students enrolled in Biology are required to take an ILEARN Assessment in the Spring of the course completion year; however, this test does not impact their graduation status.

Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT); National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (NMSQT)

This test offers sophomores and juniors an opportunity to become familiar with the kind of tests required for college entrance while at the same time entering juniors in competition for National

Merit Scholarships.  A selection score is the basis for National Merit Scholarships.  The test, given in October, is a two-hour version of the College Board Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and measures verbal, mathematic, and writing skills.  Counselors provide information about fees and registration procedures.

College Entrance Examinations

Most colleges and universities require either the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) or the ACT (American College Test) for admission.  Students should check with the college they are planning to attend to determine which test to take for admission.  The test should be taken by the spring semester of the junior year and then, if necessary, in the fall semester of the senior year.  The SAT is given in August, October, November (at North), December, March (at North), May, and June; the ACT is given in September, October (at South), December, February, April (at South), June, and July.  The SAT Subject Tests include achievement tests in specific areas that may be required for college admission or for advanced placement.        SAT will also be given in March, to all juniors, during the school day.  A score of 480 in Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and a 530 in Math will satisfy the requirements for Box 3 for Graduation Pathways.

ACCUPLACER Test

The ACCUPLACER test measures college readiness and is given to high school students planning to enroll in dual credit courses through Ivy Tech.  To receive credit, students must be enrolled at the college and, if the course requires, successfully meet specific ACCUPLACER testing requirements.  Students will not be issued college credit, regardless of course grade, if they do not meet the standardized score requirements for the course.  If students have acceptable ACT scores, PSAT scores or SAT scores they may be waived from the test for specific courses. Contact counselors with any questions.

Advanced Placement Examination

For each AP course, an AP Exam is administered at participating schools worldwide. Except for AP Studio Art – which is a portfolio assessment – each AP Exam contains a free-response section (either essay or problem-solving) and a section of multiple-choice questions. The modern language exams also have a speaking component, and the AP Music Theory Exam includes a sight-singing task. Each AP Exam is given an overall grade of 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5, with 5 indicating a student who is highly qualified to receive college credit and/or advanced placement based on an AP Exam grade. Indiana universities award credit to students who score a minimum of 3 on an exam. These tests are given in May.  Students should register with Mrs. Luken by November first  to take the tests.

SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test

The SAT is an entrance exam used by most colleges and universities to make admissions decisions. The SAT is a multiple-choice, pencil-and-paper test created and administered by the College Board. The purpose of the SAT is to measure a high school student’s readiness for college and provide colleges with one common data point that can be used to compare all applicants. College admissions officers will review standardized test scores alongside your high school GPA, the classes you took in high school, letters of recommendation from teachers or mentors, extracurricular activities, admissions interviews, and personal essays. How important SAT scores are in the college application process varies from school to school.

SRI (Scholastic Reading Inventory) Examination

Scholastic Reading Inventory is a reading comprehension test that assesses students’ reading levels, tracks students’ reading growth over time, and helps guide instruction according to students’ needs.

WIDA Examination

The purpose of the WIDA examination is to measure English language learners’ development of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and comprehension skills throughout the year.

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)

The ASVAB, sponsored by the Department of Defense, is a vocational aptitude battery consisting of ten short tests.  The results of the individual tests are combined to provide students with three academic and four occupational composite scores.  The test is given by a test administrator from the federal government.  A score of 31 or above will satisfy the requirement  for Box 3 on Graduation Pathways.

COURSES REQUIRING an APPLICATION or SCREENING PROCESS

Some courses require a special process or an application to be admitted to the class.  The applications may be obtained from North’s Counseling Office.  If the program is a two-year program, the teacher of the first-year course will also have applications.

The following courses require applications which are due when the proposed student’s schedule is submitted:

Course                                                Return to

Yearbook                                              Teacher

Medical Careers                                  Teacher

Building Trades                                  Counselor/Teacher

Work Release

Because of the state graduation requirements, and because of the state regulation requiring all students in grades 1 through 12 to have a full instructional day, no student may be granted early release for the purpose of employment.  Only those students whose approved vocational education program includes an employment component are granted a release; the time for which the student is released is considered a part of the student’s educational program.

Jack Lower Media Center and Acceptable Use Policy

The Lower Media Center program is designed and maintained to afford students and staff the opportunity to build and enhance their knowledge of curriculum data and other areas relevant to young adult interests. Reading and listening for both knowledge and pleasure is encouraged with the availability of materials in print, eBook and audio formats. We support classroom instruction and enable students to become more literate in the access, discernment, and application of information. We support the fundamentals and applications of higher order thinking skills.

The Lower collection includes more than 20,000 items in print, auditory, visual, and digital or electronic formats. While we hold the largest collection of secondary level media in the VCSC, we also offer full inter library loan services enabling our students and staff the ability to request any item in the Corporation holdings. Students and staff may borrow items at all reading and comprehension levels for personal or educational use. Full internet capabilities exist under the parameters of the VCSC. Database software includes but is not limited to Follett Library Systems, SIRS-Social Issues Resource Series, EBSCO – Social Studies, and INSPIRE, a multiplatform search engine for all subjects. Articles in SIRS and EBSCO are multilingual. Read Live, Scholastic Reading Inventory, Microsoft Excel and online PSAT programs are also available. MS Word and PowerPoint along with various math practice test sites are accessible via links. HD Start, which allows student to save their work and retrieve it from any computer in the building, is also available. Edmentum Courseware, the VCSC choice for online education credit recovery, may be accessed via the homepage. Students may work on courses in the center or from any location outside the building with proper logins/authority and internet connections.

Our fully computerized research center has instructional capabilities for 35 students. Additional workstations are available for students and staff desiring to work independently. General seating allows an additional 114 students access to quiet study. Two conference rooms allow for group work and small meetings. Complete services are offered by a licensed Media Specialist from 7:30 AM to 3:25 PM each school day.

POLICY ON CORPORATION PROVIDED ACCESS TO ELECTRONIC INFORMATION, SERVICES, AND NETWORKS

Acceptable Use Policy (AUP)

The Vigo County School Corporation incorporates its own stated educational mission, goals, and objectives in making decisions regarding student access to the corporation wide computer network and the Internet hereafter referred to as VCSC Network.  Electronic information functional skills are now fundamental to preparation of citizens and future employees.  Access to the VCSC Network enables staff and students to explore thousands of libraries, databases, bulletin boards, and other resources while exchanging messages with people around the world.  The corporation expects that faculty will blend professional use of the VCSC Network throughout the curriculum and will provide guidance and instruction to students in its appropriate use.  Access from school to VCSC Network resources must be structured in ways which point students to those which have been evaluated prior to use.  While students will be able to move beyond those resources to others in other environments that have not been previewed by staff, they shall be provided with guidelines and lists of resources particularly suited to learning objectives.

Those utilizing the VCSC Network access must first have the permission of and must be supervised by the Vigo County School Corporation’s professional staff.  Users are accountable for appropriate behavior.  The purpose of the VCSC Network access is to facilitate communication in support of research and education.  To remain eligible as users, use must be in support of and consistent with the educational objectives of the Vigo County School Corporation.  Access is a privilege, not a right.  Access entails responsibility and accountability.  Electronic messages and files stored on school based computers are school property.

Users should not expect that files stored on school based computers are private.  Supervisors may review files and messages to maintain system integrity and ensure that users are acting responsibly.  Users of corporation provided computers and the VCSC Network are not permitted to:

  • access, upload, download, or distribute pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material;
  • transmit obscene, abusive, or sexually explicit language; transmit expressions of derogatory, racism or hate;
  • vandalize, damage, or disable the property of another individual or organization;
  • access another individual’s materials, information, or files without permission;
  • violate copyright or otherwise use the intellectual property of another individual or organization without permission;
  • waste school resources such as storage space;
  • participate in network games;
  • use computer resources for non-academic activities when others require the system for academic purposes;
  • illegally install copyrighted software;
  • misrepresent other users;
  • allow non-authorized use; and
  • violate any local, state, or federal statute.

Any violation of corporation policy and rules may result in loss of access to the VCSC Network.  Additional disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion from school, may be determined in keeping with existing procedures and practices.  When and where applicable, law enforcement agencies may be involved.

Filtering:  Student Internet activities will be monitored by the school corporation to ensure students are not accessing inappropriate sites.  Each school corporation computer with Internet access shall have a filtering device or software that blocks access to visual depictions that are obscene, pornographic, inappropriate for students, or harmful to minors.

The Vigo County School Corporation makes no warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, for the VCSC Network.  The corporation will not be responsible for unauthorized financial obligations resulting from the use of the VCSC Network.

Vigo County School Corporation believes that access to the Internet benefits students and exceeds any disadvantages. Ultimately, however, parents and guardians of minors are responsible for setting and conveying the standards that their children should follow when using media and information sources.

To help with that effort, the Vigo County School Corporation makes the district’s complete Internet policy and procedures available on request for review by all parents, guardians, and other members of the community; and provides parents and guardians the option of requesting for their minor children alternative activities not requiring Internet use.

The fine arts courses at North High School have a triple role to perform.  The first of these is to provide enriched experiences for those young people with more than average potential.  It involves the discovery of such talents and encouragement and guidance of such students toward the fullest realization of their powers.  The second role is that of providing purposeful art experiences for those who show little likelihood of pursuing art as a profession or vocation.  It is a major responsibility of art education to provide the occasion and the opportunity for the individual to obtain satisfaction, enjoyment, and appreciation of the visual art experiences.  The third role is in offering the opportunity to gain a more complete and enlightened understanding of our culture, how the arts in all forms are inextricably woven into the culture of our time.  It is through active participation in these experiences that the students develop creativity and aesthetic judgment.

 Art

Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

4000 – (2D Art)

Students explore the elements of art and design and the principles governing their use as they organize, develop, create, and analyze their own visual art experiences.  Students also explore the historical foundations of various art forms and design.  Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12
  • Credits: a 1- term course for 1 credit
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40with Technical Honors diplomas

Advanced Two-Dimensional Art (L) 

4004 – (ADV 2D Art)

Advanced Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive terms of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)

4002 – (3D Art)

Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Advanced Three-Dimensional Art (L)

4006 – (ADV 3D Art I)

          (ADV 3D Art II – Crafts)

Both Advanced Art courses are designed for advanced art students who are considering professional careers or continuing an interest in art beyond the high school years.  Any of the following areas may be pursued:  drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, textiles, metal design, or ceramics.  An art portfolio is required.

3D Art II– Crafts:  This is a general introductory course to designing with materials using a variety of media techniques and processes.  The areas of ceramics, mosaics, metal-crafts, textiles, sculpture, and printmaking will be explored.

Advanced Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive terms of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Ceramics (L)             

4040 – (Ceramics)       

Emphasis will be on both the functional and non-functional approach in the design and construction of clay forms.  Both hand and wheel thrown techniques will be explored.  Students will also have experiences with texture and surface treatment, firing, and glazing of clay.

Ceramics is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in ceramics engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create works of art in clay utilizing the processes of hand building, molds, wheel throwing, slip and glaze techniques, and the firing processes. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive terms of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Sculpture (L)            

4044 – (Sculpt)

Self-expression in 3-dimensional forms is emphasized.  Students will explore both the modeling and carving approach to sculpture.  The technical processes involved in developing forms with paper, clay, plaster, wax, and wood will be taught.

Sculpture is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in sculpture engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production. Using materials such as plaster, clay, metal, paper, wax, and plastic, students create portfolio quality works. Students at this level produce works for their portfolios that demonstrate a sincere desire to explore a variety of ideas and problems. They create realistic and abstract sculptures utilizing subtractive and additive processes of carving, modeling, construction, and assembling. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  •  Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive terms of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Drawing (L)  

4060 – (Drawing I)

             (Drawing II)  

Drawing I:  This course may be considered a free hand drawing course for the beginner.  Students will be learning to use the various media for drawing.  These will include graphic pencil, charcoal, pen and ink, and others.  A variety of subject matter will be drawn and several techniques will be employed resulting in a meaningful experience for the beginning artist.

Drawing II:  This course seeks to develop the student’s power of observation, ability to define relationships, and ability to present ideas visually through the use of a variety of dry media.  Activities will increase the student’s abilities to use the drawing techniques of contour, gesture, and shading.

Drawing is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in drawing engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create drawings utilizing processes such as sketching, rendering, contour, gesture, and perspective drawing and use a variety of media such as pencil, chalk, pastels, charcoal, and pen and ink. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive terms of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma.
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

Painting (L)              

4064 – (Painting)                   

Individual expression with a variety of wet media is emphasized.  The elements which provide an aesthetic foundation for painting will be stressed through the use of a variety of materials, techniques, and approaches to the painter’s problems.  Additional student expenses for painting materials should be expected.           

Painting is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking painting engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production that lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create abstract and realistic paintings, using a variety of materials such as mixed media, watercolor, oil, and acrylics as well as techniques such as stippling, gouache, wash, and impasto. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive terms of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Fine Arts Connections – (Performing and Visual Arts-Summer School)

4026 – (FN Art Conn)                                                                                                                 

Fine Arts Connections is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art, Music, Theatre, and Dance. In this course, students make connections among experiences in the four arts disciplines and integrate them in studies of all academic disciplines. They create works encompassing multiple disciplines, literacies, and sign systems, reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about works and the nature of the arts. They incorporate presentational skills and utilize the resources of the arts community, identifying related careers.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: two or more credits in visual art, music, theatre, or dance.
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive terms of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Theatre Arts (L)

4242 – (Thtr Arts)                              

Theatre Arts is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Theatre Arts read and analyze plays, create scripts and theatre pieces, conceive scenic designs, and develop acting skills. These activities incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore career opportunities in the theatre, attend and critique theatrical productions, and recognize the responsibilities and the importance of individual theatre patrons in their community.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for two successive terms (Theatre Arts I and Theatre Arts II) of instruction at this level, provided that defined standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

Advanced Theatre Arts (L)

4240 – (ADV Thtr)
This extension of Theatre Arts will emphasize the key elements in the production of a play.  The students will concentrate on developing their acting techniques, including characterization, movement, stage business, and vocalics.  In addition, they will learn more about the technical aspects of the theater including props, costuming, and set construction.  This class fulfills a Fine Arts credit for those seeking an Academic Honors Diploma.

Advanced Theatre Arts is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Advanced Theatre Arts read and analyze plays and apply criteria to make informed judgments. They draw on events and experiences to create scripted monologues and scenes, create scenic designs for existing plays, and build characters through observation, improvisation and script analysis. These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore careers in theatre arts and begin to develop a portfolio of their work. They also attend and critique theatre productions and identify ways to support the theatre in their community.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Theatre Arts I and II (L)
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for two successive terms (Advanced Theatre Arts I and Advanced Theatre Arts II) of instruction at this level, provided that defined standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Dance Performance:  Ballet, Modern, Jazz, or Ethnic-Folk (L)

4146 – (Dnc Perf)

Dance Performance – Color Guard is a direct extension of the band program.  This course is intended to provide students with instruction in the development of Color Guard skills in the areas of equipment work (flag, rifle, and sabre), dance movement, and performance of these elements.  Students in this class participate in the Marching Band during the first semester and the Winter Guard (Indiana High School Color Guard Association and/or Winter Guard International) in the second semester.  Activities utilize a wide variety of materials and experiences and are designed to develop techniques appropriate within the Color Guard genre, including individual and group instruction and skills.  Course content will include music terminology, rhythms, tempo, melodic content and contrast, music listening, performance techniques, choreography, costuming and makeup and safety practices (warm up and cool down).

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12
  • Laboratory course
  • Credits: a 1-term course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive terms of instruction at an advanced level provided defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • A non-licensed dance instructor may be contracted with a licensed Fine Arts teacher serving as the teacher of record.

The Music Department of North High School offers a wide variety of opportunities in both vocal and instrumental music that meets the needs of the students, the school, and the community.  All of the performance classes offer various levels of proficiency that will challenge every student and enhance his/her life.  We must remember that the purpose of education is not to simply inform, but to enlighten and to provide insights into life.  No element of the curriculum is better suited to that task than music education.

Why Study Music?

Creativity:  Creativity is the source of all possibilities.  We are constantly challenged to explore this area of the mind.  Music appeals to the part of the mind that opens new horizons.  The study of music supports wonderment, imagination, appreciation, and sensitivity.  Music allows us to experience creativity as an inventive thinking style. 

Communication:  Music is a language unto itself.  Music can only be explained by music.  If we do not expose the human to music, we are depriving the individual of an array of personal understandings that cannot be found in any other part of life. 

Critical Assessment:  Intelligence is the ability to process facts and respond according to a given situation.  The individual must be able to access the cognitive (factual) and affective (emotional) sides of the mind.  Music is one of the few academic disciplines that demands this ability and reinforces learning patterns to allow for greater critical assessment. 

Commitment:  Success is not measured by what we start, but rather by what we complete.  In music, every student will prepare and rehearse literature to a higher level of performance.  The important qualities of tenacity and persistence establish habits for positive, productive living.  These attributes can be found in many subject areas; however, music does not make these optional, but a fundamental necessity from the first note ever played or sung. 

Intermediate Band (L) – (Symphonic and Marching)

4168 –

THN Recommendation:  Level 1 band requirement for freshmen

1st Semester:  Students enroll in Marching Band

THN Recommended Preparation: Moderate level of performance on a band instrument in middle school.

The Intermediate Concert Band is composed of students from grades 9, 10, 11, & 12. Placement is determined by auditions in the spring prior to the following school year and the previous band director’s recommendation. Students participate in both semesters.  Members may be required to participate in ISSMA solo and ensemble contest and organizational contest.  Extra rehearsals, performances, and concert attire will be required.

Marching Band: By registering for this class, parents and students understand they are responsible for all fees as described in the Patriot Brigade Handbook given out at the beginning of the summer. Students also have opportunities to experience live performances by professionals during and outside the school day. This group performs medium-level high school literature of varying styles. Students participating in Marching Band will be required to attend rehearsals as part of the summer band program and will also and will also be required to go to band camp. The Marching Band performs at Friday night football games as well as contests on Saturdays. It is expected that all students will participate in performances and extra rehearsals as a requirement for earning credit in the course. A tentative calendar of performances will be handed out at the beginning of the summer.
This performing ensemble is required for all students who intend to be a member of the Terre Haute North Marching Band a.k.a. Patriot Brigade.

Intermediate Concert Band is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. This course includes a balanced comprehensive study of music that develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Students study a varied repertoire of developmentally appropriate concert band literature and develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music.

Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning Concert Band
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Advanced Concert Band (L) – (Wind Ensemble)

4170 –

This ensemble is for the highly proficient instrumental student in grades 9, 10, 11, or 12. Membership is by audition only, which will be held each spring prior to the following school year. Placement is determined by auditions in the spring prior to the following school year and the previous band director’s recommendation. Students will participate in both semesters. Members may be required to participate in ISSMA solo and ensemble contest and organizational contest.  Extra rehearsals, performances, and concert attire is required.

Advanced Concert Band is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. This course provides students with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the concert band, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines.

Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning and Intermediate Concert Band
  • Laboratory course
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Jazz Ensemble (L)

4164 –

THN:  Non-credit “Early Morning” Class – Rehearses from 7:15 – 8:00 a.m.

Jazz Ensemble (Jazz Band) is a performing organization designed for the well trained musician.  Any student who is a member of one of the concert bands is eligible; however, membership is by audition only.  This organization performs at various programs and concerts throughout the school year.  Attendance is required at all performances and extra rehearsals. 

Jazz Ensemble is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Students taking this course develop musicianship and specific performance skills through group and individual settings for the study and performance of varied styles of instrumental jazz. Instruction includes the study of the history, formative, and stylistic elements of jazz. Students develop their creative skills through improvisation, composition, arranging, performing, listening, and analyzing. A limited amount of time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. In addition, a limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students must participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend the learning in the classroom. Student participants must also be receiving instruction in another band or orchestra class offering at the discretion of the director.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma if students are enrolled in another band or orchestra course
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Beginning Orchestra (L) – (Cadet)

4166 –  

THN Recommendation:  Middle school or private instructional experience in playing a stringed instrument.

Beginning Orchestra is composed of students primarily from grade 9, but can include beginners from 10, 11, and 12 who can demonstrate a basic proficiency on a stringed instrument.  This training ensemble will perform at major concerts during the school year, usually combined with Intermediate and/or Concert Orchestra.  Students will participate in both semesters.  Members may be required to participate in ISSMA solo and ensemble contest.  Extra rehearsals, performances, and concert attire will be required.  No audition is required.

Beginning Orchestra is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Students in this ensemble are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the orchestra, string and/or full orchestra, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop and refine elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of orchestral literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12
  • Laboratory course
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Intermediate Orchestra (L)

4172

This ensemble is an audition-only course.  Auditions will be performed as part of the Beginning Orchestra curriculum.  Auditions may also be scheduled, upon request, by incoming freshmen or newly enrolling orchestra students.

Intermediate Orchestra is composed of students from grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 who can demonstrate an advancing proficiency on a stringed instrument.  This training ensemble will perform at all major concerts during the school year.  Students will participate in both semesters.  Members may be required to participate in ISSMA solo and ensemble contest and organizational contest.  Extra rehearsals, performances, and concert attire will be required.

Intermediate Orchestra is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Students in this ensemble are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the orchestra, string and/or full orchestra, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop and refine elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of orchestral literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals.

Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning Orchestra
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Advanced Orchestra (L) (Concert)

4174 –     

Advanced Orchestra is an audition only course.  Auditions will be performed as part of the Beginning or Intermediate Orchestra curriculum.  Auditions may also be scheduled, upon request, by incoming freshmen or newly enrolling orchestra students.

Advanced Orchestra is a select ensemble of students from grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 who can demonstrate an advanced proficiency on a stringed instrument.  Students will participate in both semesters.  The ensemble will perform a variety of chamber, string, and/or full orchestra literature at all major concerts, recitals, various school and community events, ISSMA solo and ensemble contest at the district and state level and, organizational contest. Extra rehearsals and performances will be required. 

Advanced Orchestra is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Students in this ensemble are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the orchestra, string and/or full orchestra, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop and refine elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of orchestral literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning and Intermediate Orchestra
  • Laboratory course
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Beginning Chorus (L) 

4182 –  

Beginning Choir: 

  • Middle School Choir membership is a recommended prerequisite.
  • Membership is required all two semesters.

Beginning Choir:  This course consists of students from grades 9, 10, 11 and 12.  The performer should be able to show high school level proficiency in vocal technique and basic music reading skills.  The Beginning Choir will participate in 1 concert every 9 weeks as a part of their overall grade.  There may be after school rehearsals in which the choir is expected to attend.  In addition, the choir may be required to attend ISSMA Organizational Contest.  The Beginning Choir may perform with the other choirs in the Choral Department.  Attendance is required at all rehearsals and performances. 

Beginning High School Chorus is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Beginning Chorus develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10, 11, or 12
  • Laboratory course
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Intermediate Chorus (L) (Mixed)

4186 –  

 Intermediate Choir:  Patriot Singers

  • A Middle School Choral Placement Audition and/or Beginning High School Choir membership is a recommended prerequisite.
  • Membership is required for both semesters.

Patriot Singers: This is an auditioned course consisting of students from grades 9, 10, 11, and 12. The performer must show intermediate proficiency in vocal technique and basic music reading skills.  The Intermediate Mixed Chorus will participate in 1 concert every 9 weeks as part of their overall grade. There may be after school rehearsals in which the choir is expected to attend. In addition, the choir will be required to attend ISSMA Organizational contest.  The Intermediate Chorus will often perform with the Beginning Choir.  Attendance is required at all rehearsals, performances and contests.  Membership is required both terms. 

Intermediate High School Chorus is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Intermediate Chorus develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning Chorus
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Advanced Chorus (L) – (Counterpoints)

4188 –

Advanced Choir: 

  • A Middle School Choral Placement Audition and/or Beginning and/or Intermediate High School Choir membership is a recommended prerequisite.
  • Membership is required for both semesters.

Counterpoints: Counterpoints is an auditioned course consisting of advanced male and female students from all grade levels.  The performer must show an advanced proficiency in vocal technique and music reading skills, as well as organization and leadership abilities.  The performer must be prepared to devote many extra hours for rehearsals and performances.  Counterpoints will have at least 1 required performance a month as well as required performances almost every day during the Holiday Season.  Counterpoints represents the school throughout the city, county, state and nation.  Every school year, Counterpoints will rent the mandated formal-wear as well as the one time purchase of a Counterpoint polo.

Advanced High School Chorus is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Advanced Chorus develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Beginning  and Intermediate Chorus
  • Laboratory course
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Applied Music (L)

4200 – (Percussion – Marching)                                                                                                 

             (Percussion)     

THN Recommendation Marching:  Advanced Concert Band

THN Recommendation Percussion:  Participation in a band class
Percussion – Marching:  Students must participate in Advanced Concert Band (Marching Band) and follow all procedures of attendance, rehearsals, and performances specified for the Patriot Brigade. Camp is included.  Rehearsals begin in the spring prior to the following school year. 

Percussion:  This class is open to music students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12.  Students must participate in another band class.  Students will study advanced aspects of percussion performance.  Participation in Solo & Ensemble Contest is required, as well as attendance at all performances and extra rehearsals.

Applied Music is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral or Instrumental Music. Applied Music offers high school students the opportunity to receive small group or private instruction designed to develop and refine performance skills. A variety of music methods and repertoire is utilized to refine students’ abilities in performing, creating, and responding to music.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10, 11, or 12
  • Laboratory course
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Music History and Appreciation

4206 –                                    

Music History and Appreciation (History of Rock and Roll) is designed to increase the student’s enjoyment and knowledge of popular music and to cultivate the art of intelligent and perceptive listening. The course will include a discussion of pop and folk musical styles and related historical developments in the visual arts, literature, and world culture. Enrollment is open to all students. College Challenge enrollment is optional. Musical training of any kind is not a prerequisite for the course.

Music History and Appreciation is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Music and standards for this specific course. Students receive instruction designed to explore music and major musical styles and periods through understanding music in relation to both Western and Non-Western history and culture. Activities include analyzing and describing music; evaluating music and music performances; and understanding relationships between music and the other arts, as well as disciplines outside of the arts.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9, 10, 11, or 12
  • Credits: a 1 or 2 semester course for 1 credit each semester. The nature of this course allows for two successive semesters of instruction, provided that defined standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Music Theory, Advanced Placement

4210 –  

Music Theory, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. Music Theory is intended for secondary school students who have completed music studies comparable to a first-year college course in music theory. The guidelines for the course that are published by The College Board may not match any particular college program, but they do reflect the coverage of content and level of skills typical of most first-year college courses.  This course should integrate aspects of melody, harmony, texture, rhythm, form, musical analysis, elementary composition, and history, and style. The student’s ability to read and write musical notation is fundamental to this course, and it is also assumed that the student has acquired at least basic performance skills in voice or on an instrument. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10, 11, or 12
  • Credits: a 2 semester course for 1 credit each semester.
  • Fulfills requirement for two Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Instrumental Ensemble (L) (Beginning Guitar Techniques) & (Intermediate Guitar Techniques)

4162 –                  

Beginning guitar is composed of students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 who have a desire to learn how to play acoustic guitar, read basic notation, and perform simple pieces and chord progressions.  No audition is required, nor is any prior experiences needed.  An acoustic guitar is required.                  

Intermediate guitar is composed students from grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 who have a desire to learn how to play acoustic guitar, read advancing notation, and perform intermediate pieces, techniques, and chord progressions.  An acoustic guitar is required.

Instrumental Ensemble is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Students taking this course are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of chamber ensemble and solo literature, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive and affective domains. Students develop and refine elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature as pertaining to chamber ensemble and solo literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12
  • Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

English/Language Arts

Achieving control over language is important in all areas and at all levels of human endeavor.  It is basic to thinking and to learning.  We endorse the statement of the National Council of Teachers of English that the “skillful use of language may be the single most important means of realizing the overarching goal of education to develop informed thinking citizens.”  The semester schedule allows freshmen to earn two English credits. 

English 9

1002 – (9E)

             (9)

            (9A)

            (9AH) – AP Prep 

English 9 E:  This is a two-term course that stresses the life-long skills of writing, reading, and vocabulary.  Grammar, writing, reading, spelling and vocabulary, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills are included.  This course is designed for students who have fallen below state testing benchmarks.

English 9: This is a two-term course that stresses the life-long skills of writing, reading, and vocabulary.  Grammar, writing, reading, spelling and vocabulary, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills are included. 

English 9A: For the student who has earned high grades in English classes and scored well on standardized measures of skills needed for success in English classes.  This class for college-bound students will focus on major literary works such as Romeo and Juliet and The Odyssey.

English 9AH (Pre-Advanced Placement): This class is for the academically talented student.  Students will read, respond to, and analyze the literature.  Their class roles will include being readers as well as writers.  Oral presentations are required.  Vocabulary will be emphasized.  The ninth grade English honors section serves as the foundation for a further understanding and appreciation of literature.  Students qualify for the Honors program through test scores and teacher and parent recommendations.  Students will participate in an English Honors Project as an integral part of the students’ experience in the course.  This project should be designed to integrate knowledge, skills and concepts from the English/language arts academic standards in a culminating project consisting of: (1) an individual research paper, (2) a product that demonstrates the application of what was learned, and (3) a formal presentation.  The English Honors Project should consist of an individually written research report, a major product, and an oral presentation.  It should have the following three components:

English 9, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 9 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring a wide-variety of genres and their elements. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 9 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 2 credits, full-year course with 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

English 10

1004 – (10E)

            (10)

            (10A)

            (10AH) – AP Prep

Students will take the graduation qualifying exam, ISTEP+, during this course.

English 10E:  This course is designed for tenth grade students who have fallen below state testing benchmarks.  The basic skills of reading, writing, grammar, listening, and speaking are stressed.  Literature, critical thinking skills, test taking strategies, spelling, and vocabulary development are incorporated in this course. 

English 10: This two-term course is designed for most tenth grade students.  The basic skills of reading, writing, grammar, listening, and speaking are stressed.  World literature, critical thinking skills, test taking strategies, spelling, and vocabulary development are incorporated in the course. 

 English 10 A: This course, designed for students who have previously been academically successful in English classes, emphasizes literature, grammar, speech, composition, and vocabulary for the college-bound student.

 English 10 AH (Pre-Advanced Placement): This course for the academically talented student focuses on British literature.  Students read, respond to, and analyze the literature, examining as both readers and writers its literary, historical, cultural, and philosophical impact.  In addition to literary study and literature-based writing, students will also explore various types of composition, including expository, persuasive and researched writings.  Students will sharpen their communication skills verbally via group projects and individual presentations.  Because words are the essential tool of the effective communicator, students will also work on increasing their vocabulary skills, along with developing style through the study of language and rhetoric.  The class includes preparatory reading for the Advanced Placement exam.  Students qualify for the Honors Program through test scores and teacher and parent recommendations.  This course is for the academically talented student.  Students will participate in an English Honors Project as an integral part of the students’ experience in the course.  This project should be designed to integrate knowledge, skills and concepts from the English/language arts academic standards in a culminating project consisting of: (1) an individual research paper, (2) a product that demonstrates the application of what was learned, and (3) a formal presentation. The English Honors Project should consist of an individually written research report, a major product, and an oral presentation.  It should have the following three components:

English 10, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 10 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language

Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring universal themes across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 10 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 10
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9AH or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 2 credits, a two-semester course with 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

English 11

1006 – (11E)

            (11)

            (11A)              

English 11E:  This course is designed for students who have fallen below state testing benchmarks.  Strong emphasis on American literature and practical writing is provided.   Students will study communication skills, grammar, listening, speaking, spelling, and vocabulary development. 

English 11: This course for most eleventh grade students emphasizes American literature and practical writing.  Units on grammar, listening, speaking, spelling, and vocabulary development are included to improve students’ communication skills.

English11A: This course consists of a well-balanced correlation of academic American literature and composition.  It is designed for those students who have previously been academically successful in English classes.  Critical thinking skills and test-taking strategies are included as well as units on vocabulary development, usage, agreement, listening, and oral communication.  Class activities are designed to prepare students for college- level work.  Students in this course will survey American literature and develop writing skills through creative and expository writing.  Class activities are designed to prepare students for college-level work.

English 11, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 11 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring characterization across universal themes and a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 11 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write fictional narratives, short stories, responses to literature, reflective compositions, historical investigation reports, resumes, and technical documents incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9 and English 10 or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 2 credits, a two-semester course with 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

English Language and Composition 11, Advanced Placement (Potential College Credits Available)

1056(Lng/Comp AP1)

           (Lng/Comp AP2)

THN Recommendation:  Completion of English 10AH or English 10A with teacher recommendation

This course for academically talented students is a chronological survey of literature in the United States.  The emphasis of the course is upon extensive sampling of traditionally accepted American classics.   As both readers and writers, students read, analyze, and respond to literature from thematic, structural, philosophical, historical, and cultural points of view.  Students will also be expected to give a variety of oral presentations and to participate in class discussions.  Because clear use of language is necessary for a person to be an effective communicator, vocabulary study will also be incorporated in the program.  This course will help prepare students for the advanced placement test in English Language and Composition which may be taken in the spring of the junior year. 

English Language and Composition, Advanced Placement, is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Advanced Placement (AP) Courses are intended to be the equivalent to the comparable college level course. Most AP courses require instructional time equivalent to two traditional semesters, or one academic year in order to adequately address the course content and prepare students for the associated exam. However, the bulleted items following each course description indicate the AP courses that could conceivably be completed in either one semester or two.
  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11 or 12 (College Board does not designate when this course should be offered).
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9 and English 10 or other literature, language, composition, and speech courses or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 2 credits, a two-semester course with 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • English 12 could be incorporated into this course, if this course is offered at Grade 12

English 12 (English 12 C and English 12 L)

1008 – (Eng 12C) – (Eng 12L)

              (12E)

English 12, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts for Grade 12 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication focusing on an exploration of point of view or perspective across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance for Grade 12 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write fictional narratives, short stories, responses to literature, reflective compositions, historical investigation reports, resumes and technical documents incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, and English 11 or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 2 credits, a two-semester course with 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

English Literature and Composition 12, Advanced Placement

1058 – (Lit/Comp AP 1)

            (Lit/Comp AP 2)

THN Recommendation:  THN Recommendation:  Completion of English 11AP or English 11A with teacher recommendation

This two-term course is designed for academically talented students.  Throughout the course, students will experience a variety of literary masterpieces.  Students will study the style and structure of specified works as well as focus on the lifestyle and society of the authors with an emphasis on the relevancy and application of themes.  Composition is emphasized.  Students also orally present individual and group projects as well as engage in class discussions.

English Literature and Composition, Advanced Placement, is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. An AP English course in Literature and Composition engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Advanced Placement (AP) Courses are intended to be the equivalent to the comparable college level course. Most AP courses require instructional time equivalent to two traditional semesters, or one academic year in order to adequately address the course content and prepare students for the associated exam. However, the bulleted items following each course description indicate the AP courses that could conceivably be completed in either one semester or two.
  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 and 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9 and English 10 or other literature, language, composition, and speech courses or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 2 credits, a two-semester course with 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • College Board does NOT designate the grade level (Grade 11 or 12) when this course should be offered.
  • English 12 could be incorporated into this course, if this course is offered at Grade 12

English as a New Language

1012 –

GOAL: The intent of the ENL course is to move students as successfully, smoothly, and rapidly as possible into the Core 40 English courses offered in grades 9-12.

English as a New Language, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards, is the study of language, literature, composition and oral communication for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students so that they improve their proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension of standard English. Students study English vocabulary used in fictional texts and content-area texts, speak and write English so that they can function within the regular school setting and an English-speaking society, and deliver oral presentations appropriate to their respective levels of English proficiency.

  • Recommended Grade Level: The intent of the ENL course is to move students as successfully, smoothly, and rapidly as possible into the Core 40 English courses offered in grades 9-12.
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English proficiency placement test results
  • Credits: A two-semester course, one credit per semester.  The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instructions at advanced levels (up to a maximum of four credits).
  • English/Language Arts credit (1012): If ENL course work addresses Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, up to four (4) credits accrued can be counted as part of the eight (8) required English/Language Arts credits for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.
  • World Language credit (2188): If ENL course work addresses Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages and is taken concurrently with another English/Language Arts course, up to four (4) credits accrued may count as World Language credits for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.
  • A Career Academic Sequence or Flex Credit course
  • Language Proficiency Standards: http://www.doe.in.gov/lmmp/standards.html

Classical Literature

1026 – (Class Lit)

THN Suggested Grade Level:  12

THN Recommendation:  11A or 11AP

Classical Literature, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of Ancient Greek and Roman literature by the major authors, such as Aristotle, Cicero, Dante, Euripides,

Homer, Ovid, Plato, Plutarch, Sappho, Sophocles, St. Augustine, Virgil, and others. Students examine a variety of literary genres, such as tragedy, comedy, epic, lyric, novel, oratory, and others. Students analyze themes as they relate to the transition from oral to literate cultures, the emergence of cities and empires, the use of mythology, and the rise and fall of democracy. Students analyze how classical literary patterns, themes, and conventions have influenced modern literature.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.
  • If this course is taught at Grade 9 or 10, the standards for Grade 9 or 10 should be used.

English Literature                

1030 – (Eng Lit)

THN Suggested Grade Level:  12

English Literature, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of representative works of the English-speaking authors associated with the Commonwealth of Nations, including England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Canada, Newfoundland, Australia, New Zealand, India, South Africa, Kenya, Botswana, and others. Students examine a wide variety of literary genres that reflect the English-speaking peoples from the Anglo-Saxon Period to the present. Students analyze how the ideas and concepts presented in the works are both interconnected and distinctly reflective of the cultures and the countries in which they were written.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 or 2 credits
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.
  • If this course is taught at Grade 9 or 10, the standards for Grade 9 or 10 should be used.

Film Literature

1034 – (Film Lit)

Film Literature, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of how literature is adapted for film or media and includes role playing as film directors for selected screen scenes. Students read about the history of film, the reflection or influence of film on the culture, and issues of interpretation, production and adaptation. Students examine the visual interpretation of literary techniques and auditory language in film and the limitations or special capacities of film versus text to present a literary work. Students analyze how films portray the human condition and the roles of men and women and the various ethnic or cultural minorities in the past and present. FILM LITERATURE PROJECT: Students complete a project, such as doing an historical timeline and bibliography on the development of film or the creation of a short- subject film, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and progress in the Film Literature course content.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Literary Movements (Lit Mvmts CC)

1040 – (Lit Mvmts)                                                                                                                            

THN Grade Level:  12

THN Recommendation:  11A or 11AP

Literary Movements, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of representative European or American literature produced during the historical time periods of Ancient Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the literary periods of Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, The Harlem Renaissance, and Contemporary Literature. Students examine a variety of literary genres, such as dramas, epic and lyric poetry, novels, oratory, short stories, biographies, journals, diaries, essays, and others. Students analyze how the trends and movements shaped the literature of the time and how the works of the various literary trends and movements continue to affect contemporary literature and issues.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9A, English 10A, English 11A, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • College Challenge (CC) offers up to three hours of college credit through Indiana State University
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

Poetry

1044 – (Poetry)

Poetry, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of poetic works, the interpretation of poetry, and the variety of structures, devices, and themes that differentiate one type of poetry from another. Students examine a wide variety of major poetic works from the English-speaking world and English translations of important works from the non-English-speaking world. Students analyze the impact of aural devices, such as meter, alliteration, assonance, and rhyme, on the overall interpretation of a poem and how poetry is a form of literary expression that has prevailed through the ages.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

Themes in Literature

1048 — (Themes Lit SciFi)

(Themes Lit Sprt)

(Themes Lit WomenLit)

 Science Fiction:  The main goal of this course is to introduce students to the development of this genre and to expose them to a variety of writers and writings, mostly short stories.  Short papers, research, and oral presentations are course expectations.

Sports:  The subject of this course is the human side of sports, not the statistics.  Relevance will be presented as the relation of sports to life as seen through the eyes of contemporary and basic writers.

Women’s Literature:  This course examines a variety of genres of women writers from the past to the present and their depiction of changing lifestyles and values with which women have experimented

Themes in Literature, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of universal themes, such as the journey of the hero, the trials of youth, the search for identity, and other themes appropriate to the level and interests of students. The course may be limited to a few important related themes. Students examine representative works in various genres by authors of diverse eras and nationalities and the way themes may be treated differently in the works because of the cultural context. Students analyze how themes illuminate humanity’s struggle to understand the human condition.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

World Literature

1052 – (World Lit)

THN Grade Level:  12           

World Literature, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of ancient and modern representative works by major authors from six continents: Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America. Students examine a wide variety of literary genres and themes. Students analyze how the ideas and concepts presented in the works are both interconnected and reflective of the cultures and historical periods of the countries represented by the authors.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, English 11, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

Composition

1090 – (Comp)

 THN Suggested Grade Level:  12

Composition, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies of narration, description, exposition, and persuasion. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, English language conventions, research and organizational skills, an awareness of the audience, the purpose for writing, and style. Students read classic and contemporary literature or articles and use appropriate works as models for writing. Students write a variety of types of compositions with a focus on fictional narratives, reflective compositions, academic essays, and responses to literature.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, English 11, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a literature course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

Advanced Composition (Potential College Credits Available)

1098 – (Adv Comp)                                                                                                                           

THN Suggested Grade Level:  12

THN Recommendation:  11A or Composition

Advanced Speech and Communication, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies of exposition and persuasion. Students write expository critiques of nonfiction selections, literary criticism of fiction selections, persuasive compositions, and research reports. ADVANCED COMPOSITION PROJECT: Students write job applications, resumes, and other informational documents that may include the development of flyers, posters, brochures, program agendas, or reports incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, or tables.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 11A with grade of ‘C’ or higher, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a literature course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

Creative Writing

1092 – (Creat Writ)                                                                                                                         

Composition, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies for prose and poetry. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, the nuances of language and vocabulary, English language conventions, an awareness of the audience, the purposes for writing, and the style of their own writing. CREATIVE WRITING PROJECT: Students complete a project, such as a short story, a narrative or epic poem, a persuasive speech or letter, a book review, a script or short play, or other creative compositions, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and writing progress in the Creative Writing course content.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English 9, English 10, or teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a literature course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

Speech and Communication

1076 – (Speech)

Speech, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts Standards, is the study and application of the basic principles and techniques of effective communication. Students deliver focused and coherent speeches that convey clear messages, using gestures, tone, and vocabulary appropriate to the audience and purpose. Students deliver different types of oral and multi-media presentations, including viewpoint, instructional, demonstration, informative, persuasive, and impromptu. Students use the same Standard English conventions for oral speech that they use in their writing.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 1 or 2 credits
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a literature or composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

Advanced Speech and Communication (Potential College Credits Available)

1078 – (Adv Speech)

Advanced Speech and Communication, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and emphasizing the High School Speech and Communication Standards, is the study and application of skills in listening, oral interpretation, media communications, research methods, and oral debate. Students deliver different types of oral and multi-media presentations, including speeches to inform, to motivate, to entertain, and to persuade through the use of impromptu, extemporaneous, memorized, or manuscript delivery. ADVANCED SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION PROJECT: Students complete a project, such as multi-media presentations that are reflective, reports or historical investigations, responses to literature, or persuasive arguments, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and speaking progress in the Advanced Speech and Communication course content. Students wanting this course must have successfully completed Speech and Communication.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Speech
  • Credits: 1 or 2 credits
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a literature or composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.

Etymology (Word Power) [SAT and PSAT Prep]

1060 – (Etymology)                                                                                                                           

Etymology, a language studies course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is the study and application of the derivation of English words and word families from their roots in ancient and modern languages (Latin, Greek, Germanic, Romance Languages). Students analyze meanings of English words by examining roots, prefixes, suffixes. Students analyze the connotative and denotative meaning of words in a variety of contexts and the reasons for language change. Students write about word history and semantics in texts that require etymological sensitivity, such as Renaissance poetry or works in translation. ETYMOLOGY PROJECT: Students complete a project, such as doing a case study on specific words or creating a historical timeline of the development of specific words, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and progress in Etymology course content.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 10, 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 credit
  • Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to combine this course with a literature or composition course that they take before, concurrently, or after the course.
  • This course may be used to help students increase their vocabularies as preparation to perform well on the SAT or ACT.

 Journalism

1080 – (Jrnalism 1)

            (Jrnalism 2)                                                                                                                            

This course is a prerequisite for students interested in working on the school newspaper or yearbook.

Journalism, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of communications history including the legal boundaries and the ethical principles that guide journalistic writing. It includes a comparison study of journalistic writing to other types of writing. Students prepare for a career path in journalism by working on high school publications or media staffs. JOURNALISM PROJECT for the second credit: Students complete a project, such as a special feature magazine or mini-documentary on a topic of interest or concern. The project demonstrates knowledge, application, and progress in Journalism course content.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Journalism I (Grades 9 and 10), Journalism II (Grades 9,10,11, or 12)
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Journalism I: None or teacher recommendation; Journalism II: Journalism I
  • Credits: 1 or 2 credits Second credit may be subtitled Advanced to allow for a successive semester of instruction at an advanced level.
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma
  • English/Language Arts credit (1080): If Journalism course work addresses Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the student also takes a two-credit English Advanced Placement course plus corresponding AP exams or a two-credit English dual credit course, up to two (2) credits accrued can be counted as part of the eight (8) required English/Language Arts credits for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.
  • Journalism Academic Career Path form; High School Journalism Standards; Research Standards; Historical Events Timeline: http://doe.in.gov/opd/languagearts/welcome.html
  • NOTE: This is not a student publications course. The designated school newspaper or yearbook course is Student Publications (1086).

Student Publications

1086 – (Stdnt Pubs NP1)

            (Stdnt Pubs NP2)                                                                                                                   

            (Stdnt Pubs YB1)

            (Stdnt Pubs YB2)

* (NP = Newspaper; YB = Yearbook)

Student Publications, a course based on the High School Journalism Standards and the Student Publications Standards, is the continuation of the study of journalism.  Students demonstrate their ability to do journalistic writing and design for high school publications, including school newspapers and yearbooks, and a variety of media formats.  Students follow the ethical principles and legal boundaries that guide scholastic journalism.  Students express themselves publicly with meaning and clarity for the purpose of informing, entertaining, or persuading.  Students work on high school publications or media staffs so that they may prepare themselves for career paths in journalism, communications, writing, or related fields.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 10, 11, or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Journalism I, Journalism II may be waived with teacher recommendation
  • Credits: 1-8 credits. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at advanced levels. May be offered over three- or four-years by subtitling the course Beginning, Intermediate, or Advanced.
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas or two (2) credits accrued as an English/Language Arts
  • requirement for the General Diploma only if the course work addresses Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts
  • Journalism Academic Career Path form; High School Journalism Standards; Student Publications Standards: http://doe.in.gov/opd/languagearts/welcome.html

NOTE: This is the designated school newspaper or yearbook course.

Mathematics

Mathematics Lab

2560 – (AlgI MthLb)

Mathematics Lab provides students with individualized instruction designed to support success in completing mathematics coursework aligned with Indiana’s Academic Standards for Mathematics.  It is recommended that Mathematics Lab is taken in conjunction with a Core 40 mathematics course, and the content of Mathematics Lab should be tightly aligned to the content of its corresponding course. Mathematics Lab should not be offered in conjunction with Algebra I or Integrated Mathematics I; instead, schools should offer Algebra Enrichment or Integrated Mathematics Enrichment to provide students with rigorous support for these courses.

  • Credits: A one to eight credit elective course
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Clarifying information can be appended to the end of the course title to denote the content covered in each course
    • Example: Mathematics Lab used to support students in Algebra I can be recorded on the transcript as Mathematics Lab – Algebra I.

Algebra I Lab 1

2516 – (Alg Enrich)

Algebra Enrichment is a mathematics support course for Algebra I.  The course provides students with additional time to build the foundations necessary for high school math courses, while concurrently having access to rigorous, grade-level appropriate courses.  The five critical areas of Algebra Enrichment align with the critical areas of Algebra I:  Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships; Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadratic Functions and Modeling.  However, whereas Algebra I contains exclusively grade-level content, Algebra Enrichment combines standards from high school courses with foundational standards from the middle grades.

  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Counts as a Mathematics Course for the General Diploma only or as an Elective for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Algebra Enrichment is designed as a support course for Algebra I. As such, a student taking Algebra Enrichment must also be enrolled in Algebra I during the same academic year.

Algebra I

2520 – (Alg I)                                                                                                                                     

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relations and Functions; Linear Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Nonlinear Equations; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; and Polynomial Expressions. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Fulfills the Algebra I/Integrated Mathematics I requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Students pursuing Core 40, Core 40 with Academics Honors, or Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma should receive credit for Algebra I by the end of Grade 9
  • Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course for the General, Core 40, AHD, and THD diplomas

Algebra II, IIA

2522 – (Alg II)

            (Alg IIA)                                                                                                                                 

Algebra IIA: This course covers all the Indiana State Academic Standards for Algebra II and is offered to accelerated track mathematics students.  Students will be exposed to concepts in greater depth and will move through material at a faster pace.

Algebra II builds on work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and allows for students to extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Algebra I
  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Fulfills the Algebra II/Integrated Mathematics III requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas and counts as a Mathematics Course for the General Diploma
  • Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course for the General, Core 40, AHD, and THD diplomas

Geometry, Geometry A

2532 – (Geom)

            (Geom A)                                                                                                                               

Geometry A:  This course covers all the Indiana State Academic Standards for Geometry and is offered to accelerated track mathematics students.  Students will be exposed to concepts in greater depth and will move through material at a faster pace.

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Congruency and Similarity; Measurement; Analytic Geometry; Circles; and Polyhedra. Close attention should be paid to the introductory content for the Geometry conceptual category found in the high school CCSS. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Algebra I
  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Fulfills the Geometry/Integrated Mathematics II requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas and counts as a Mathematics Course for the General Diploma

Quantitative Reasoning 

2530 –

Quantitative Reasoning is an umbrella of mathematical topics.  It is a course designed for students who will undertake higher-level mathematics in college that may not include calculus.

Topics include: (1) counting techniques, (2) financial problem-solving, (3) recursion, (4) graph theory, (5) social choice, (6) linear programming, and (7) business modeling.  Technology, such as computers and graphing calculators, should be used frequently.

  • Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra II
  • Credits: A two credit course based on Indiana’s Common Core Standards for Finite Mathematics
  • Counts as a Mathematics Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry

2564 – (Pre-Calc/Trig)

            (Pre-CalcA/Trig A)                                                                                                         

Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry A: This course covers all the Indiana State Academic Standards for Pre-Calculus and is offered to accelerated track mathematics students.  Students will be exposed to concepts in greater depth and will move through material at a faster pace.

Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry is a two-credit course that combines the material from Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus into one course.  The foundations of algebra and functions developed in previous courses will be extended to new functions, including exponential and logarithmic functions, and to higher-level sequences and series. The course provides students with the skills and understandings that are necessary for advanced manipulation of angles and measurement.  Students will also advance their understanding of imaginary numbers through an investigation of complex numbers and polar coordinates. The course is designed for students who expect math to be a major component of their future college and career experiences, and as such it is designed to provide students with strong foundations for calculus and other higher-level math courses.

  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Algebra II and Geometry or Integrated Mathematics III
  • Credits: A two-credit course
  • Counts as a Mathematics Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Calculus AB, Advanced Placement

2562 – (CalcABAP)
Calculus AB, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Calculus AB is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections among these representations also are important. Topics include: (1) functions, graphs, and limits; (2) derivatives; and (3) integrals. Technology should be used regularly by students and teachers to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap-calculus-course-description.pdf

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Pre-calculus/Trigonometry
  • Credits: One credit per semester
  • Counts as a Mathematics Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Statistics, Advanced Placement (Stat AP)

2570 –                                                                                                                                                

Statistics, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board.  The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.   Topics include: (1) exploring data: describing patterns and departures from patterns (2) sampling and experimentation: planning and conducting a study, (3) anticipating patterns: exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and (4) statistical inference: estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.  The use of graphing calculators and computer software is required. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap-statistics-course-description.pdf

  • Recommended Grade Level:  Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Algebra II or Integrated Mathematics III
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course. 1 credit per semester.   Due to the level of rigor, it is recommended that AP Statistics be offered as a 2 semester, 2 credit course. Counts as a Mathematics Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

CCR Bridge: Math Ready (Now called PRISM)

2514 –

CCR Bridge: Math Ready will include and reinforce the Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 and Statistics skills necessary to be ready for an entry-level college math course. This course emphasizes understanding of math concepts rather than just memorizing procedures. Math Ready students learn the context behind the procedure: why to use a certain formula or method to solve a problem, for example. This equips them with higher-order thinking skills in order to apply math skills, functions and concepts in different situations. The course is intended for students who currently have achieved the minimum math requirements for college entry. The content of this course is designed to enhance students’ math skills so that they are ready for college-level math assignments. It is not designed to prepare students for college-level math in STEM majors.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: In grade 11, students who have not passed the Grade 10 Math ISTEP+ (or old Algebra 1 ECA) and have scored below a 45 on the PSAT test OR students who score below proficient on a diagnostic test should be placed in the Math Ready course
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as a Mathematics Course for all diplomas

Math 10

2531 –Math 10 2

Math 10 is a new two-semester course designed to reinforce and elevate the Algebra 1 and 7th and 8th grade geometry knowledge and skills necessary for students to successfully complete high school mathematics courses beyond Algebra 1 and essentials for passing the state’s graduation qualifying exam in mathematics. Enrollment will be contingent upon recommendation of the Algebra I or Integrated Math I teacher based on diagnostic results of performance in Algebra I and/or mathematics competency assessments. The standards for this course are aligned to the state standards that students need to master for success with the state’s graduation qualifying exam in mathematics and the next level math courses. Emphasis is on a variety of instructional methods designed to meet each student’s needs and delivered through competency-based units with frequent pre and post assessment data analyzed to drive instructional design and delivery.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10,11,12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Students who have attempted a complete year of Algebra 1
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as a Mathematics Course for the General Diploma only or as an Elective for the Core 40, Core 40with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Physical Education

One year (two terms) of Physical Education and one semester of Health are required by the State of Indiana for graduation from high school.  The curriculum offered to the students maintains and improves their overall fitness levels. 

Beginning in 2015 Vigo County School Corporation has established universal physical education guidelines for all secondary level schools.  Please be advised that ALL high schools are instructed to teach the following activities (see chart below) and no more than within their class. Note. The first three that are italicized within the column are requirements.  These activities have been designated to ensure that every child, no matter which school they attend, will receive the same activities within a semester.  It also ensures that activities are not being duplicated from PEI to PEII and that our students are actively engaged in a wide variety of skills and lessons.

PEI PEII
*SOCCER *BADMINTON
*ULTIMATE FRISBEE *FLOOR HOCKEY
*PICKLEBALL *FITNESS CENTER X2 DAYS A WEEK
*VOLLEYBALL FLAG FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL ALASKAN/ADVANCED KICKBALL
TENNIS TRASHCAN/FRISBEE GAME
KICKBALL (REGULAR) FRISBEE GOLF
SPEEDBALL RACQUETBALL
FITNESS CENTER X 2 DAYS A WEEK WHIFFLEBALL/BASEBALL/SOFTBALL
AEROBIC/ANAEROBIC CONDITIONING FLICKERBALL/PATRIOT BALL
ONE MILE RUN (OPTIONAL) TRACK UNIT
AEROBIC/ANAEROBIC CONDITIONING (WRESTLING ROOM)
ONE MILE RUN (REQUIRED)
COOPERATIVE GAMES/RELAYS ETC

Physical Education I (L) (PHYS ED)

3542 –                                                                                                                                                

Physical Education I focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum which provide students with opportunities to actively participate in at least four of the following: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; all which are within the framework of lifetime physical activities and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEP’s and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9 – 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Grade 8 Physical Education
  • Credits: 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills part of the Physical Education requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Recommended: Classes are co-educational unless the activity involves bodily contact or groupings based on an objective standard of individual performance developed and applied without regard to gender.
  • Adapted physical education must be offered, as needed, in the least restricted environment and must be based upon an individual assessment.
  • As a designated laboratory course, 25% of course time must be spent in activity

Physical Education II (L) (PHYS ED II)

3544 –                                                                                                                                          

Physical Education II focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum which provide students with opportunities to actively participate in four of the following that were not taught in Physical Education I: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities, and  outdoor pursuits, all which are within the framework of lifetime physical activities and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEP’s and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9 – 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  Physical Education I
  • Credits: 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills part of the Physical Education requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Recommended: Classes are co-educational unless the activity involves bodily contact or groupings based on an objective standard of individual performance developed and applied without regard to gender.
  • Adapted physical education must be offered, as needed, in the least restricted environment and must be based upon an individual assessment.
  • As a designated laboratory course, 25% of course time must be spent in activity.

Physical Education II Waiver

  1. Overview – Allow credit for PE II for students rostered in an IHSAA sport, Cheer, Dance, Color Guard, Winter Guard or Marching Band in lieu of taking the actual class
  • All students take PE I in the traditional format
  • Students wanting to use the waiver may participate in an IHSAA sport, Cheer, Dance, Color Guard, Winter Guard, Marching Band
  • Students must complete the season in good standing. Good standing is full and active participation in the entire season for the sport or activity as determined by the coach or director. A completed season is defined as first practice to final event
  1. The students would be scheduled into the course in the master schedule with a “zero hour” course
  • Students may be scheduled up to 8 periods a day
  • PE II is scheduled as a “zero hour” after school (PE takes place during their after-school practice/ game)
  • Students may be scheduled into PE 1 and PE 11 Alternative in the same semester.

Elective Physical Education (L) (ELECT PE)

3560 –Advanced Physical Conditioning I – X

 Lifeguarding

*(Course is offered at the Aquatics Center, transportation not provided)

Advanced Physical Conditioning – This class is designed for students wishing to improve their speed, strength, power, and endurance.  Students will follow a teacher designed workout that is adaptable to student needs.  This workout will consist of intense weight lifting and aerobic endurance training (speed development drills, agility drills, plyometrics) sessions.  Students are evaluated on attendance, participation, written tests, and improvement.  Students must complete PE I and PE II with a B average.

Advanced Physical Conditioning/Sports – This class is designed for students who would like in-depth study in specific sports 3 days per week coupled with weight training and conditioning 2 days per week.  In the fitness center students will follow a teacher designed workout that will be assessed on improvement, attendance and participation. Fall term the course will include flag football and ultimate frisbee.  Winter term focus will be in volleyball and basketball.  Spring term will focus on badminton and tennis.  Evaluation in this component will be based on skills tests, game rules and strategies, written tests and coaching aspects.  Students must complete PE I and PE II with a B average.

Elective Physical Education, a course based on selected standards from Indiana’s Academic Standards for Physical Education, identifies what a student should know and be able to do as a result of a quality physical education program. The goal of a physically educated student is to maintain appropriate levels of cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life. Elective Physical Education promotes lifetime sport and recreational activities and provides an opportunity for an in-depth study in one or more specific areas. A minimum of two of the following activities should be included: team sports; dual sports activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance. It includes the study of physical development concepts and principles of sport and exercise as well as opportunities to develop or refine skills and attitudes that promote lifelong fitness. Students have the opportunity to design and develop an appropriate personal fitness program that enables them to achieve a desired level of fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEP’s and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10 – 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  Physical Education I and II
  • Credits: 1 credit per semester, or upon mastery of course standards.  There is no maximum amount of credits that may be earned provided that there is no course or skill level duplication.
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Recommended: Classes are co-educational unless the activity involves bodily contact or groupings based on an objective standard of individual performance developed and applied without regard to gender.
  • Adapted physical education must be offered, as needed, in the least restricted environment and must be based upon an individual assessment.
  • As a designated laboratory course, 25% of course time must be spent in activity.

Health

3506 –                                                                                                                                                

Health & Wellness, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for Health & Wellness, provides the basis to help students adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. Health education should contribute directly to a student’s ability to successfully practice behaviors that protect and promote health and avoid or reduce health risks.  Through a variety of instructional strategies, students practice the development of functional health information (essential concepts); determine personal values that support health behaviors; develop group norms that value a healthy lifestyle; develop the essential skills necessary to adopt, practice, and maintain health-enhancing behaviors. This course includes the application of priority areas in a planned, sequential, comprehensive health education curriculum. Priority areas include: promoting personal health and wellness, physical activity, healthy eating, promoting safety and preventing unintentional injury and violence, promoting mental and emotional health, a tobacco-free lifestyle and an alcohol- and other drug-free lifestyle and promoting human development and family health. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills of health and wellness core concepts, analyzing influences, accessing information, interpersonal communication, decision-making and goal-setting skills, health-enhancing behaviors, and health and wellness advocacy skills.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9 – 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  8th grade health education
  • Credits: 1 credit,  1 semester course

Fulfills the Health & Wellness requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Science

Biology I (L)

3024 – (Bio I)

            (Bio IA)

Students will take the ISTEP+ End-of-Course Assessment upon completion of this course. This exam does not impact graduation.
Biology IA):  This course is an accelerated version of Biology I with additional emphasis on a more cellular/chemical approach to biology. Added emphasis will be given to the molecular explanations of life particularly as it relates to modern understanding of genetics and evolution. Additional effort will be made to provide both individual and group experiences to demonstrate the responsible role of biology in our increasingly bio-technical society.  Students in this course will conduct additional scientific investigations utilizing hypothesis testing.

Biology I is a course based on the following core topics:  cellular chemistry, structure and reproduction; matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence of organisms; molecular basis of heredity; genetics and evolution.  Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9
  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Fulfills the Biology requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Biology, Advanced Placement (L)

3020 – (Bio AP)                                                                                                                                 

Biology, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. The major themes of the course include: The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life, Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis, Living systems store, retrieve, transmit and respond to information essential to life processes, Biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties.  A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level:  11-12
  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Biology I and Chemistry I
  • Credits: A two credit course, 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as a Science Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Zoology – Advanced Science, Special Topics

3092 – (Adv Sci ST Zoo)

Zoology provides an in-depth study of the animal kingdom.  Emphasis is given to the economic importance of animals with proper emphasis placed on environmental and ecological factors.  It covers cells, metabolism, and organism from the protozoa to the vertebrate.  There is a focus on the comparison of systems in the various phyla and the study of life histories of organisms.  Laboratories include dissection of selected invertebrates and vertebrates for comparison of anatomy and physiology between phyla.  This is an excellent course for those interested in veterinary medicine, medicine, oceanography, or environmental science.

Advanced Science, Special Topics is any science course which is grounded in extended laboratory, field, and literature investigations into one or more specialized science disciplines, such as anatomy/physiology, astronomy, biochemistry, botany, ecology, electromagnetism, genetics, geology, nuclear physics, organic chemistry, etc. Students enrolled in this course engage in an in-depth study of the application of science concepts, principles, and unifying themes that are unique to that particular science discipline and that address specific technological, environmental or health-related issues.  Under the direction of a science advisor, students enrolled in this course will complete an end-of-course project and presentation, such as a scientific research paper or science fair project, integrating knowledge, skills, and concepts from the student’s course of study. Individual projects are preferred, but group projects may be appropriate if each student in the group has specific and unique responsibilities.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  11-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry I or higher
  • Credits: 1 credit per semester. May be offered for successive semesters
  • Counts as a science course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Anatomy and Physiology I, Anatomy and Physiology IA (CC)

5276 – (A&P I-1 and A&P I-2)                                                                                                                                                 

Anatomy & Physiology is a course in which students investigate concepts related to Health Science, with emphasis on interdependence of systems and contributions of each system to the maintenance of a healthy body. Introduces students to the cell, which is the basic structural and functional united of all organisms, and covers tissues, integument, skeleton, muscular and nervous systems as an integrated unit. Through instruction, including laboratory activities, students apply concepts associated with Human Anatomy & Physiology. Students will understand the structure, organization and function of the various components of the healthy body in order to apply this knowledge in all health related fields.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11,12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry I or higher
  • Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 2 semesters, maximum of 2 credits
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Fulfills a Core 40 Science course requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas or counts as an Elective or Directed Elective for any diploma
  • This course is aligned with postsecondary courses for Dual Credit (Anatomy IA-1 & IA-2 only)

Chemistry I, Chemistry IA (L)

3064 – (Chem I)

           (Chem IA) 

Chemistry IA: This course is an extension of Chemistry I.  It is a college preparatory laboratory course emphasizing the development of concepts and theories in chemistry.  The experimental nature of science is the basis for student investigation of chemical reactions.  The main goals of the course include a study of electron structure, shape, relative size, and shape of atoms, and molecules, and the forces between them.  The properties are used to explain oxidation-reduction, equilibrium, and rates of chemical reaction.  The mole concept is studied to understand chemical reactions.  These concepts are expected to guide the student in his/her understanding and interpretation of complex chemical phenomena.  A mathematical approach is used.

Chemistry I is a course based on the following core topics:  properties and states of matter; atomic structure; bonding; chemical reactions; solution chemistry; behavior of gases, and organic chemistry.   Students enrolled in Chemistry I compare, contrast, and synthesize useful models of the structure and properties of matter and the mechanisms of its interactions.  Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures. Recommended Grade Level:  10-12

  • Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra II (can be taken concurrently)
  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Fulfills physical science requirement for the General diploma. Fulfills Chemistry credit for Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course for the General, Core 40, AHD, and THD diplomas

Chemistry II (L)

3066 – Inorganic (ChemII Inor)/ Organic (ChemII Org)

             Organic (ChemII Org)/ Biochemistry (ChemII Bio)

Laboratory activities seek to introduce advanced instrumentation for the purpose of separating, analyzing and investigating the nature of matter and the changes it undergoes.  These courses will aid in the preparation for AP Biology, AP Chemistry or preparation for a college major/minor in Chemistry, Biology, Biochemistry, Pharmacy, Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Pre-Veterinarian, or Nursing, Medical Technology.

Inorganic Chemistry continues the study of Chemistry I through quantitative analysis of inorganic chemical reactions including thermochemistry, kinetics, and chemical equilibrium. 

Organic Chemistry students will learn to identify and name fundamental organic molecules along with the common reactions they undergo. 

Biochemistry students will develop an understanding of the structure biological molecules as they relate to organic functional groups and their role in biological systems. 

Chemistry II is an extended laboratory, field, and literature investigations-based course. Students enrolled in Chemistry II examine the chemical reactions of matter in living and nonliving materials. Based on the unifying themes of chemistry and the application of physical and mathematical models of the interactions of matter, students use the methods of scientific inquiry to answer chemical questions and solve problems concerning personal needs and community issues related to chemistry.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  11-12
  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Chemistry I, Algebra II
  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Fulfills physical science requirement for the General diploma. Fulfills Chemistry credit for Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course for the General, Core 40, AHD, and THD diplomas
  • Dual Credit (8 Credit hours) 4 for Organic and 4 for Biochem.  (Inorganic is prerequisite)

Chemistry, Advanced Placement (L)

3060 – (Chem AP)

This course is intended to provide students with the course content covered in a first year college inorganic chemistry course with the possibility of earning college chemistry credit.  The AP Chemistry course will focus on the study of chemical reactivity, structure of matter and the driving processes behind the changes of matter.  Hands-on laboratory experimentation will be used to test fundamental principles and theories in Chemistry while making qualitative and quantitative observations.  This course will aid in the preparation for a college major in Biology, Chemistry, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Physics, Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Pre-Veterinarian and Engineering.

Chemistry, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. The content includes: (1) structure of matter: atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, molecular models, nuclear chemistry; (2) states of matter: gases, liquids and solids, solutions; and (3) reactions: reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics.  A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Advanced Placement (AP) Courses are intended to be the equivalent to the comparable college level course. Most AP courses require instructional time equivalent to two traditional semesters, or one academic year in order to adequately address the course content and prepare students for the associated exam.
  • Recommended Grade Level:  12
  • Recommended Prerequisite: Chemistry I, Algebra II
  • Credits: 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as a Science Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course for the General, Core 40, AHD, and THD diplomas
  • Dual Credit (8 Credit hours ) 4 for Semester 1 and 4 for Semester 2

Earth and Space Science I (L)

3044 – (EAS Sci I)

Earth and Space Science I is a course focused on the following core topics:  study of the earth’s layers; atmosphere and hydrosphere; structure and scale of the universe; the solar system and earth processes.  Students analyze and describe earth’s interconnected systems and examine how earth’s materials, landforms, and continents are modified across geological time.  Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-10
  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Fulfills the earth and space science requirement for the General Diploma. Fulfills Core 40 science credit for Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Astronomy – Advanced Science Special Topics

3092 – (Adv Sci ST Astr)

Astronomy:  This course is offered at Terre Haute South (transportation not provided) and will provide students an opportunity to study stars, the physical nature of stars, and their life cycle, as well as the constellations and their location in the night sky on a daily and yearly basis.  Extensive observing of these constellations and stars is done with the planetarium dome so that the student becomes familiar with the daily and yearly motion of the stars.  In addition to our current knowledge of stars, students will study the history of astronomy.  Students will learn about some of the monuments built by ancient civilizations to study the sky and why the sky was important to those civilizations.  An introduction to telescopes both as a tool of large observatories and as a personal tool will be discussed.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Credits: 1 credit per semester.
  • Counts as a science course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Botany –

3092 – (Adv-Sci ST Bot)

Advanced Science, Special Topics is any science course which is grounded in extended laboratory, field, and literature investigations into one or more specialized science disciplines, such as anatomy/physiology, astronomy, biochemistry, botany, ecology, electromagnetism, genetics, geology, nuclear physics, organic chemistry, etc. Students enrolled in this course engage in an in-depth study of the application of science concepts, principles, and unifying themes that are unique to that particular science discipline and that address specific technological, environmental or health-related issues. Under the direction of a science advisor, students enrolled in this course will complete an end-of-course project and presentation, such as a scientific research paper or science fair project, integrating knowledge, skills, and concepts from the student’s course of study. Individual projects are preferred, but group projects may be appropriate if each student in the group has specific and unique responsibilities.

This course is an in-depth study of the plant world for students interested in continued development of their science experience. Emphasis is on student experimentation on the growth of plants in a greenhouse, classification, horticulture, and the environment.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 11-12
  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Counts as a Science Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Integrated Chemistry-Physics (L)

3108 – (ICP)

This course is a terminal science course that should be used only to meet CORE 40 graduation requirements.  Those seeking Academic Honors Diplomas should take Chemistry and Physics as preparation for college.

Integrated Chemistry-Physics is a course focused on the following core topics:  motion and energy of macroscopic objects; chemical, electrical, mechanical and nuclear energy; properties of matter; transport of energy; magnetism; energy production and its relationship to the environment and economy.  Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-10
  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Algebra I (may be taken concurrently with this course)
  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Fulfills the physical science requirement for the General diploma. Fulfills the 2 credit requirement for Chemistry I, Physics I, or Integrated Chemistry and Physics towards the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Physics I

3084 – (Phys I)                                                                                                                                  

Physics I is a course focused on the following core topics: constant velocity; constant acceleration; forces; energy; linear momentum in one dimension; simple harmonic oscillating systems; mechanical waves and sound; simple circuit analysis. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10-12
  • Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra II
  • Credits: A two credit course
  • Fulfills the 2-credit requirement for Chemistry I, Physics I, or Integrated Chemistry and Physics towards the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course for the General, Core 40, AHD, and THD diplomas

Physics Advanced Placement I

S 01175

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. Students explore principles of Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Students establish lines of evidence and use them to develop and refine testable explanations and predictions of natural phenomena. Focusing on these disciplinary practices enables teachers to use the principles of scientific inquiry to promote a more engaging and rigorous experience for AP Physics students. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10-11
  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Algebra II, Credits: 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as a Science Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Dual Credit available (4 hours for completion of Semester 2, Semester 1 is prerequisite)

Physics Advanced Placement II (L)

3088 – (PhyCAP)

AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills.

Students explore principles of fluids, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics, and topics in modern physics. Students establish lines of evidence and use them to develop and refine testable explanations and predictions of natural phenomena. Focusing on these disciplinary practices enables teachers to use the principles of scientific inquiry to promote a more engaging and rigorous experience for AP Physics students.

A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level:  11-12
  • Recommended Prerequisite:  Physics I, or AP Physics 1, Algebra II Credits: 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as a Science Course for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Dual Credit available (4 hours for completion of Semester 2, Semester 1 is prerequisite)
  • Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course for the General, Core 40, AHD, and THD diplomas

Environmental Science, Advanced Placement (L)

3012 – (ENVSCI AP)

Environmental Science, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Students enrolled in AP Environmental Science investigate the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level: 12
  • Recommended Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry
  • Credits: 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as a Science Course for all diplomas, Qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning course for General, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Social Studies

World History and Civilization (WLD HST/CVL)

1548 –            

World History emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras.  Key events related to people and places as well as transcultural interaction and exchanges are examined in this course.  Students are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world.  They will examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Students are also expected to practice skills and process of historical thinking and research and apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes.  There will be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 10
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills a Social Studies requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas or counts as an Elective for any diploma

AP World History Modern (WLD HST M AP)

1612 –

AP World History Modern is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university world history course. According to the College Board AP World History Modern students “investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in historical periods from approximately 1200 CE to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; making historical comparisons; utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time; and developing historical arguments. The course provides five themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures

  • Recommended Grade Level: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills the Geography History of the World/World History and Civilization graduation requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

United States History (US HIST)

1542 –            

United States History builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of U.S. History.  Students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation.  The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present.  Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History.  They will develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit each semester
  • Fulfills the US History requirement of the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

United States History, Advanced Placement (US HIST AP) (US HIST CC)

1562 –

United States History, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. The course has a chronological frame from 1492 to the present and focuses on multiple causation and change in United States history over time. A variety of historical themes are examined in order to place the history of the United States into larger analytical contexts Students are expected to analyze and interpret primary sources and develop awareness of multiple interpretations of historical issues in secondary sources. Historical events and issues in U.S. history are to be examined from multiple perspectives. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: A 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills the US History requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas or counts as an Elective for any diploma
  • College Challenge (CC) offers up to six hours of college credit through Indiana State University (must be in both semesters to earn six credits)

AP European History (Eur Hst AP)

1556-

AP European History, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from approximately 1450 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course also provides seven themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction of Europe and the world, economic and commercial development, cultural and intellectual development, states and other institutions of power, social organization and development, national and European identity, and technological and scientific innovations.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11 and 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: World History
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit each semester
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

United States Government (US GOVT)

1540 –                        

United States Government provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States.  Responsible and effective participation of citizens is stressed.  Students will understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and governments and understand the rights and responsibilities of citizens and how these are part of local, state, and national government.  Students will examine how the United States Constitution protects rights and provides the structure and functions of various levels of government.  How the United States interacts with other nations and the government’s role in world affairs will be examined.  Using primary and secondary resources, students will articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on political issues.  As a result, they will be able to explain the role of individuals and groups in government, politics, and civic activities and the need for civic and political engagement of citizens in the United States.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 1 semester, 1 credit
  • Fulfills the Government requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas or counts as an Elective for any diploma

United States Government and Politics, Advanced Placement (US GOVT AP)

1560 –                                                                                                                                                

United States Government and Politic, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Topics include: (1) constitutional underpinnings of United States government, (2) political beliefs and behaviors, (3) political parties, interest groups, and mass media, (4) institutions of national government, (5) public policy, and (6) civil rights and civil liberties. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: A 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester
  • Fulfills the US Government requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas or counts as an Elective for any diploma

Economics

1514 –

Economics examines the allocation of resources and their uses for satisfying human needs and wants. The course analyzes economic reasoning used by consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, and government in making decisions.  Key elements of the course include study of scarcity and economic reasoning, supply and demand, market structures, role of government, national income determination, the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Students will explain that because resources are limited, people must make choices and understand the role that supply, demand, prices, and profits play in a market economy. The functions of government in a market economy and market structures will be examined. Students will understand economic performance, money, stabilization policies, and trade of the United States. The behavior of people, societies and institutions and economic thinking is integral to this course.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit
  • Fulfills the Economics requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, Core 40 with Technical Honors, a Social Studies requirement for the General Diploma, or counts as an Elective for any diploma

Microeconomics, Advanced Placement (MICRO – ECON)

1566 –                        

Microeconomics, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board.   The course gives students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economics system. Topics include: (1) basic economic concepts, (2) the nature and functions of product markets, (3) factor markets, and (4) market failure and the role of government. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course. 1 credit per semester
  • College Challenge (CC) credit can be earned
  • Fulfills the Economics requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, Core 40 with Technical Honors, a Social Studies requirement for the General Diploma, or counts as an Elective for any diploma

Macroeconomics, Advanced Placement (MACRO – ECON)

1564 –

Macroeconomics, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determinations, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Topics include: (1) Basic economic concepts, (2) measurement of economic performance, (3) national income and price determination, (4) economic growth, and (5) international finance, exchange rates, and balance of payments. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course. 1 credit per semester
  • College Challenge (CC) credit can be earned
  • Fulfills the Economics requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, Core 40 with Technical Honors and International Baccalaureate diplomas, a Social Studies requirement for the General Diploma, or counts as an Elective for any diploma

Psychology (PSYCH)

1532 –
Psychology
is the scientific study of mental processes and behavior.  The course is divided into six content areas and uses the scientific methods to explore research methods and ethical consideration.  Developmental psychology takes a life span approach to physical, cognitive, language, emotional, social, and moral development.  Cognitive aspects of the course focus on learning, memory, information processing, and language.  Personality, Assessment, and Mental Health topics include psychological disorders, treatment, personality, and assessment.  Socio-cultural dimensions of behavior deal with topics such as conformity, obedience, perceptions, attitudes, and influence of the group on the individual. The Biological Basis focuses on the way the brain and nervous system function, including sensation, perception, motivation, and emotion.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 & 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course. 1 credit per semester. This course and corresponding exam are intended to be comparable to the corresponding one-semester college level course.
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Psychology, Advanced Placement (PSYCH AP)

1558 –

Psychology, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes. Topics include: (1) history and approaches, (2) research methods, (3) biological bases of behavior, (4) sensation and perception, (5) states of consciousness, (6) learning, (7) cognition, (8) motivation and emotion, (9) developmental psychology, (10) personality, (11) testing and individual differences, (12) abnormal psychology, (13) treatment of psychological disorders, and (14) social psychology A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Psychology or Topics in Social Science (Psychology II)
  • Credits: A 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Topics in Social Science (Psychology II)

1550-

Topics in Social Science provides students with an opportunity for in-depth study of a specific topic, theme, or concept in one of the social science disciplines such as anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, or sociology. It is possible to focus the course on more than one discipline.  A subtitle gives a clear idea of the course content.  For example, a course focusing on a specific in political science might be entitled, “Topics in Social Science: Comparative Government.”  Courses taught under this title should emphasize scientific methods of inquiry and help students develop effective research and thinking skills.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • A Career Academic Sequence or Flex Credit course

Sociology (SOCIOLOGY)

1534 –                                                                                                                                          

Sociology allows students to study human social behavior from a group perspective.  The sociological perspective is a method of studying recurring patterns in people’s attitudes and actions and how these patterns vary across time, cultures, and in social settings and groups.  Students will describe the development of sociology as a social science and identify methods of research.  Through research methods such as scientific inquiry students will examine society, group behavior, and social structures. The influence of culture on group behavior is addressed through institutions such as the family, religion, education, economics, community organizations, government, and political and social groups.  The impact of social groups and institutions on group and individual behavior and the changing nature of society will be examined.  Influences on group behavior and social problems are included in the course.  Students will also analyze the role of individuals in the community and social problems in today’s world.

  • Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 1 semester, 1 credit
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

State and Local Government (ST/LOC GOVT)

1536 –

State and Local Government is the study of the function and organization of state, county, city, town, and township government units.  The primary focus is on the major factors and issues in the state’s political development.  This course also traces the role and influence of political and social institutions on a state’s political development.  The implications of this development for governmental units should be discussed relative to current political and governmental situations.  Field trips, observations, and interviews with state and local leaders should be encouraged whenever possible.

  • Recommended Grade Level: None
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: 1 semester, 1 credit
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Current Problems, Issues, and Events

1512 –                                                                                                                                          

Current Problems, Issues, and Events gives students the opportunity to apply investigative and inquiry techniques to the study of significant problems or issues.  Students develop competence in (1) recognizing cause and effect relationships, (2) recognizing fallacies in reasoning and propaganda devices, (3) synthesizing knowledge into useful patterns, (4) stating and testing hypotheses, and (5) generalizing based on evidence.  Problems or issues selected will have contemporary historical significance and will be studies from the viewpoint of the social science disciplines.  Community service programs and internships within the community may be included.

  • Recommended Grade Level: None
  • Recommended /Required Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 semester, 1 credit.  Course may be repeated for credit if the content of the course changes.
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

World Geography (WORLD GEO)

1546 –

World Geography allows students to study the interaction of humans and their environments in a world setting. Students study global patterns of physical and cultural characteristics, including the Earth/sun relationship, atmospheric and oceanic circulation, landforms, climate, vegetation, population, economic and political structures, culture, cultural diffusion, and international and interregional connections. Using maps, geographic representations and technology such as geographic information systems (GIS), students will examine spatial relationships, the interaction of physical and cultural characteristics of designated places, areas, or regions. Students are expected to apply knowledge of geographic concepts and uses of geography to inquiry, research, and use participatory processes. The themes of location, characteristics of place, human/environmental interaction, movement between places, and regions anchor the course content. Emphasized are elements of the National Geography Standards: The World in Spatial Terms, Places and Regions, Physical Systems, Human Systems and Environment and Society.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 11,12
  • Recommended /Required Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester.
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Indiana Studies (IN Studies)

1518 –

Indiana Studies is an integrated course that compares and contrasts state and national developments in the areas of politics, economics, history, and culture. The course uses Indiana history as a basis for understanding current policies, practices, and state legislative procedures. It also includes the study of state and national constitutions from a historical perspective and as a current foundation of government. Examination of individual leaders and their roles in a democratic society will be included and student will examine the participation of citizens in the political process. Selections from Indiana arts and literature may also be analyzed for insights into historical events and cultural expressions.

  • Recommended Grade Level: None
  • Recommended /Required Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 semester, 1 credit, 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • Must be offered at least once per school year

World Language

Even though English may be an international language, true communication with other human beings comes when we speak their language.  Perhaps we might better understand the thinking of world neighbors – friend or foe- if we could communicate in their language.  By studying only English, Americans lose the ability to walk in another person’s shoes, to unscramble their mode of thinking, and to understand how their language reflects their culture and value system.

WHY STUDY WORLD LANGUAGES?

A world language can be a benefit personally, socially, and economically.

  1. Learning a world language will help a student understand English grammar and increase his English vocabulary.
  2. Students who have been language-trained usually have higher scores on the PSAT and SAT examinations.
  3. With a language skill added to other skills, a person seeking employment might increase his/her chances of getting a job he/she wants.
  4. People of other nations welcome travelers who try to speak their language.  It is useful to have a workable knowledge of the geography, history, and vocabulary often needed by a traveler.
  5. Many great writers, poets, composers, artists, and statesmen from other countries have shaped our own ways of thinking and feeling.  Knowing the language will help improve understanding of these ideas and the world in which we live.
  6. In the study of language, students realize that learning takes place through listening and speaking as well as by reading and writing activities.
  7. Studying a language improves one’s mental discipline and ability to reason.
  1. The study of a language is also the study of history, law, government, psychology, economics, art, science, music, architecture, dance, theater, and many other fields of learning.
  2. Tremendous employment opportunities are available to students who have studied a world language.
  3. Many universities now require a world language for admission and/or graduation.

Chinese I

2000 – (Chin I-1)

            (Chin I-2)

Chinese I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Chinese language learning, and to various aspects of Chinese-speaking culture.  This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write simple sentences using characters. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as recognizing characters and sounds of familiar words and comprehending brief oral directions.  Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of Chinese-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices and the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Credits:  2 semester course, 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors Diploma

Chinese II

2002 – (Chin II-1)

            (Chin II-2)

Chinese II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Chinese language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes.  This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write sentences and descriptions using characters.  This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and recognizing words and characters through stroke order and stroke count.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Credits:  2 semester course, 1 credit per semester
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors Diploma

Chinese III

2004 – (CHI III-1)

(CHI III -2)

Chinese III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Chinese language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to initiate, sustain and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write simple paragraphs using characters. This course also emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using radicals, stroke order, and stroke count to guess meaning. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student- created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of Chinese speaking culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding Chinese language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Chinese I and II
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

French I

2020 – (Fren I-1)

             (Fren I-2)

French I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning French language learning, and to various aspects of French-speaking culture. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write short passages with guidance. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as reading isolated words and phrases in a situational context and comprehending brief written or oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of French-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding French language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  None
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

French II

2022 – (Fren II-1)

 (Fren II -2)

French II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for French language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of French-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding French language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  French I
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

French III

2024 – (Fren III-1)

            (Fren III-2)

French III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for French language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to initiate, sustain and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail. This course also emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending detailed written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of French-speaking culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding French language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  French I and II
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

French Language and Culture, Advanced Placement 

2032 – (Fren Lang AP 1)

            (Fren Lang AP 2)

French Language, Advanced Placement  is based on content established by the College Board Emphasizing the use of the French language for active communication, the AP French Language course has as its objectives the development of Spoken Interpersonal Communication, Written Interpersonal Communication, Audio, Visual, and Audiovisual Interpretive Communication, Written and Print Interpretive Communication, Spoken Presentational Communication, Written Presentational Communication, . Course content might best reflect interests shared by the students and the teacher, e.g. the arts, current events, sports, etc.  Students develop language skills that are useful in themselves and can be applied to various activities and disciplines rather than being limited to any specific body of subject matter. Extensive practice in the organization and writing of compositions should also be emphasized.   A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level:  11-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  French I, II and III
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

German I

2040 – (Ger I-1)

             (Ger I-2)

German I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning German language learning, and to various aspects of German-speaking culture. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write short passages with guidance. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as reading isolated words and phrases in a situational context and comprehending brief written or oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of German-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding German language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  None
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

German II

2042 – (Ger II-1)

           (Ger II-2)

German II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for German language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of German-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding German language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  German I
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

German III

2044 – (Ger III-1)

            (Ger III-2)

German III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for German language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to initiate, sustain and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail. This course also emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending detailed written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of German-speaking culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding German language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  German I and II
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

German IV

2046 – (Ger IV-1)

            (Ger IV-2)

German IV, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, provides a context for integration of the continued development of language skills and cultural understanding with other content areas and the community beyond the classroom. The skill sets that apply to the exchange of written and oral information are expanded through emphasis on practicing speaking and listening strategies that facilitate communication, such as the use of circumlocution, guessing meaning in familiar and unfamiliar contexts, and using elements of word formation to expand vocabulary and derive meaning. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of German-speaking culture through explaining factors that influence the practices, products, and perspectives of the target culture; reflecting on cultural practices of the target culture; and comparing systems of the target culture and the student’s own culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas through the design of activities and materials that integrate the target language and culture with concepts and skills from other content areas. The use and influence of the German language and culture in the community beyond the classroom is explored through the identification and evaluation of resources intended for native German speakers.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: German I, II and III
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

Latin I

2080 – (Lat I-1)

            (Lat I-2)         

Latin I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Latin language learning, and to various aspects of classical Roman culture. This course emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as reading isolated words and phrases in a situational context and comprehending brief written or oral directions. Though interpersonal communication is not an explicit emphasis of this course, opportunities may be provided for students to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write short passages with guidance. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of classical Roman culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Latin language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  None
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

Latin II

2082 – (Lat II-1)

            (Lat II-2)                                                                                                                          

Latin II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Latin language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Though interpersonal communication is not an explicit emphasis of this course, opportunities may be provided for students to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of classical Roman culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Latin language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  Latin I
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

 

Latin III

2084 – (Lat III-1)

            (Lat III-2)                                                                                                                               

Latin III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Latin language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending details written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Though interpersonal communication is not an explicit emphasis of this course, opportunities may be provided for students to initiate, sustain and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail.

Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of classical Roman culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding Latin language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  Latin I and II
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

Latin IV

2086 – (Lat IV-1)

           (Lat IV-2)                                                                                                                                

Latin IV, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, provides a context for integration of the continued development of language skills and cultural understanding with other content areas and the community beyond the classroom. Students will continue to develop presentational skills by giving presentations on cultural topics and presenting culturally authentic material, such as plays. This course emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as guessing meaning in familiar and unfamiliar contexts and using elements of word formation to expand vocabulary and derive meaning. Though interpersonal communication is not an explicit emphasis of this course, opportunities may be provided for students to practice strategies that facilitate advanced oral and written communication, such as circumlocution. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of classical Roman culture through explaining factors that influence the practices, products, and perspectives of the target culture; reflecting on cultural practices of the target culture; and comparing systems of the target culture and the student’s own culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well as exploration of the use and influence of the Latin language and culture in the community beyond the classroom through activities such as the identification and evaluation of resources intended for those fluent in Latin.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  10-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  Latin I, II and III
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

Spanish I

2120 – (Span I-1)

            (Span I-2)

Spanish I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Spanish language learning, and to various aspects of

Spanish-speaking culture. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write short passages with guidance. This course also

emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as reading isolated words and phrases in a situational context and comprehending brief written or oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

Spanish II

2122 – (Span II-1)

            (Span II-2)

Spanish II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Spanish language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level:  9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  Spanish I
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

Spanish III

2124 – (Span III-1)

            (Span III-2)

Spanish III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Spanish language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to initiate, sustain and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail. This course also emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending detailed written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of Spanish-speaking culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 9-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Spanish I and II
  • Credits: A 2-credit course
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

Spanish Language, Advanced Placement

2132 –  (Sp Lang AP 1)

             (Sp Lang AP 2)

Spanish Language, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Emphasizing the use of the Spanish language for active communication, the AP Spanish Language course has as its objective the development of advanced listening comprehension, reading without the use of a dictionary, expanded conversational skills, fluent and accurate written expression, and strong command of vocabulary and structure of the Spanish language. Course content might best reflect interests shared by the students and the teacher, e.g. the arts, current events, sports, etc. The AP Spanish Language course seeks to develop language skills that are useful in themselves and that can be applied to various activities and disciplines rather than being limited to any specific body of subject matter. Extensive practice in the organization and writing of compositions should also be emphasized. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

  • Recommended Grade Level:  11-12
  • Recommended Prerequisites:  Spanish I, II and III
  • Credits: A 2-credit course, 1 credit per term
  • Fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma

English as a New Language

2188 – (ENL)

English as a New Language, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards, is the study of language, literature, composition and oral communication for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students so that they improve their proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension of standard English. Students study English vocabulary used in fictional texts and content-area texts, speak and write English so that they can function within the regular school setting and an English-speaking society, and deliver oral presentations appropriate to their respective levels of English proficiency.

  • Recommended Grade Level: The intent of the ENL course is to move students as successfully, smoothly, and rapidly as possible into the Core 40 English courses offered in grades 9-12.
  • Recommended Prerequisites: English proficiency placement test results
  • Credits: A two-term course, one credit per term.  The nature of this course allows for successive terms of instructions at advanced levels (up to a maximum of four credits).
  • English/Language Arts credit (1012): If ENL course work addresses Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, up to four (4) credits accrued can be counted as part of the eight (8) required English/Language Arts credits for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.
  • World Language credit (2188): If ENL course work addresses Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages and is taken concurrently with another English/Language Arts course, up to four (4) credits accrued may count as World Language credits for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

Language Proficiency Standards:  http://www.doe.in.gov/lmmp/standards.html

Multidisciplinary

Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps

(AFJROTC)

Aerospace Science/Leadership Education I, II, III, IV

0516 –  (AS/LE I)

(AS/LE II)

(AS/LE III)

(AS/LE IV)

Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC) is a program designed to develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community.  As a citizenship program, there is never an obligation to serve in the military after taking AFJROTC courses.  However, students choosing to enter the armed forces, who complete two and three years of AFJROTC, are eligible to enlist at a higher rank and pay.

To support the citizenship mission, AFJROTC produces “world-class” academic materials for our units worldwide, with many courses being eligible for college credit; we also participate in a number of extracurricular activities and community service events throughout the school year.  Retired Air Force commissioned and noncommissioned officers teach AFJROTC classes.

Each AFJROTC class consists of three components—aerospace science, leadership education, and a wellness program.  Citizenship and character education, the heart of the curriculum program, is primarily embedded in the leadership education series of courses, while sense of service and education in science and technology related aerospace science is primarily found in the aerospace science series of courses.

To reinforce what is taught in the classroom, students participate in many outside activities such as field trips to military bases, aerospace facilities and industries, museums, civilian airports and other areas related to aerospace education.  AFJROTC also offers the opportunity to participate in extracurricular activities to include: AFJROTC – Civil Air Patrol Orientation Flights (half hour flight in a Cessna aircraft), Drill Team, Color Guard, Raiders, Rocketry Club, CyberPatriot Team, summer leadership schools, and Kitty Hawk Air Society (AFJROTC Honor Society).  Cadets have opportunities to fly our multicopter, remote controlled airplane and computer flight simulator.  Additionally, community service projects are a major part of the AFJROTC experience and helps instill a sense of civic pride and citizenship.

The objectives of AFJROTC are to educate and train students in citizenship and life skills; promote community service; instill a sense of responsibility; and develop character and self-discipline through education and instruction in air and space fundamentals and the Air Force’s core values of “Integrity First, Service Before Self and Excellence In All We Do.”

This program will enable the students to:

  • Develop a high degree of strong morals, self-esteem, self- reliance, personal appearance, and leadership.
  • Adhere to the values of integrity, service, and excellence.
  • Increase their understanding of patriotism and responsibilities as U.S. citizens.
  • Participate in community service activities.
  • Expand their skills of critical thinking and problem solving, communication and collaboration, and creativity and innovation.
  • Demonstrate military customs, courtesies, and traditions and develop habits of order, discipline, and social skills.
  • Acquire a broad-based knowledge of aerospace studies and leadership education.
  • Strive to graduate from high school and prepare for college and careers in the 21st century.
  • Cultivate a commitment to physical fitness and a healthy lifestyle.

College Credits for Air Force Junior ROTC

AFJROTC cadets have the opportunity to earn approved general elective credits at Adams State University (ASU) which is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Accreditation Association.  A maximum of 22 college credits may be earned for leadership and history courses completed by high school students enrolled in AFJROTC.

The process to earn college credits through Adams State University is facilitated by RTG & Associates, Inc.

Leadership courses and History course approved for credit are:

  • HIST 179 – American History and It’s Veterans, 1890 through Today (3 credits) (Done in conjunction with American History I & II)
  • HGP 179 – Citizenship (3 credits) **( Service Project required for AFJROTC Programs)
  • ID 179 – College Options – (1 credit – Optional for all Programs)
  • ID 179 – College Options – (3 credits – Optional for all Programs)
  • ID 279 – Fundamentals in Aviation: A Pilot’s Perspective (AFJROTC Honors Cadets Only – 3 credits)
  • LEAD 120 – American Veterans – Profiles in Leadership (3 credits)**
  • LEAD 122 – Personal Financial Management (2 credits)**
  • LEAD 124 – Character Education (2 credits)**
  • LEAD 128 – American Defense Policies and Leadership (Seniors – 3 credits)
  • LEAD 130 – Foundations for Health, Wellness, and Physical Fitness (2 credits)
  • LEAD 132 – Cultural Understanding of Leadership Development through Global Studies (1-3 credits)
  • LEAD 134 – Military Historical Staff Ride (3 credits)
  • LEAD 136 – Basic Leadership Experiences (Juniors – 3 credits)
  • LEAD 138 – Service Learning, An American Ethic (2 credits)**
  • LEAD 140 – Introduction to Space Exploration (Juniors/Seniors – 3 credits)
  • LEAD 142 – American Leader Research Development Project (1 credit)

** These five courses have inherent in them a Community Service-Learning Education Project. Additional information is located at:  http://www.leadershipcredit.info/jrotc-leadership-credits/

  • Recommended Grade Level: None
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: A one to eight credit course. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of study at an advanced level, provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.
  • Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

Peer Tutoring / Peer Educator 1 and 2

0520 –

Peer Tutoring 1:  This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of physical and mental disabilities, to gain knowledge in the field of special education, to learn teaching skills and to explore career options to help integrate students with significant disabilities into school.  Students will assist in the instruction of students with significant disabilities under the direction of a certified instructor.  Admission approved by instructor.

Peer Tutoring 2:  This course will emphasize behavior management strategies, instructional strategies, and the ability to identify and describe different disability areas.  Students will learn the role of a special education teacher and related service personnel.  Students must complete Peer Educator 1.  This class is monitored by a Special Education teacher.

Peer Tutoring provides high school students with an organized exploratory experience to assist students in kindergarten through grade twelve (K-12), through a helping relationship, with their studies and personal growth and development. The course provides opportunities for the students taking the course to develop a basic understanding of individual differences and to explore career options in related fields. Peer Tutoring experiences are preplanned by the teacher trainer and any cooperating teacher under whom the tutoring is to be provided. It must be conducted under the supervision of a licensed teacher. The course provides a balance of class work relating to the development of and use of:  (1) listening skills, (2) communication skills, (3) facilitation skills, (4) decision-making skills, and (5) teaching strategies.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11 or 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: None
  • Credits: One credit per semester up to 2 credits
  • Counts as an Elective for all diplomas

Career Information and Exploration – Internship

0522 –  2 credits, 1 term              

THN Suggested Grade Level:   12

Students will experience first-hand a career area that will provide the student with an opportunity to determine if this is a future career interest.  The internship will also provide an additional option to students during their senior year.  Open to seniors (those NOT in co-op programs) during the 2nd term of the school year (students MUST have passed the GQE).  Students are to submit a proposal by December 15.  Please see your counselor for a complete application proposal.

The course in Career Information and Exploration provides students opportunities to learn about themselves and about various traditional and nontraditional occupations and careers. Students also gain an awareness of the type of occupational preparation or training needed for various occupations and careers. Students develop skills in:  (1) employability, (2) understanding the economic process, and (3) decision making and planning. Opportunities are provided for students

Community Service

0524 –

Community Service is a course created by public law IC 20-30-14, allowing sophomores, juniors and seniors the opportunity to earn up to two high school credits for completion of approved community service projects or volunteer service that “relates to a course in which the student is enrolled or intends to enroll.”

  • Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
  • Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, up to 2 semesters, 2 credits maximum

Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Helpful descriptions for parents & students

Introductory/Exploratory Courses– Classes that do not count for dual college credit and do not count as a main career pathway class.  The purpose of these classes is to provide an initial experience for students that do not know what career path they want to pursue.  These courses also allow students to gain additional experiences that are in other career pathways to help develop a more well-rounded education.  All grades are eligible for these classes.  

Career Pathway (NLPS)– A deliberate series of courses made up of a principles course, concentrator A, concentrator B, and capstone course that connect to post-secondary education/training and a career.  Most of these pathways have embedded transferrable dual college credit and industry credentials as part of the pathway.  Some result in a technical certificate or eliminating one year of post-secondary education.  The Class of 2025 and Class of 2026 must use this system.  The Class of 2024 can opt into this system.

Career Pathway (old)– A two level system of courses based on credits at each level that is being phased out by the State.  The only courses that are still available are courses needed by Class of 2024 students that had started in this old system by the 2020-21 school year and have now earned at least 4 credits in the old system.  No new students should register for classes in this old system.  

Applied Courses– These courses are for students that are on a certificate track and credits are not awarded in these classes.  Before a student moves to certificate track, they must have approval of the school.

Work-based Learning vs. Internship– Work-based learning is an experience, usually paid, that is directly linked to a career pathway a student has been studying so the student gains a deeper understanding of the chosen career path.  An internship is typically not related to a career path being studied in school but still provides a student real-world experience to help them better make choices for the future.  An internship can be paid or unpaid.  Both happen during the senior year and students must work a minimum of 85 hours a semester.

What do the 4 numbers mean? The 4-number code is the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) identifier for the course.  If you add a “1” after the number, it will mean it is a first semester course in the VCSC and a “2” after the number it is a second semester course.  If there are any letters included in the number, these are added to help counselors’ sort various sections of classes and mean different things.  In some cases, the IDOE requires a course be taken for both semesters and students must take the course for both semesters per State rules.

Student Selection Process for Courses- Students attempting to enroll in an introductory course will be evaluated based on attendance and previous CTE grades which could be student middle level specialty grades.  Once a student participates in a “Principles” level class, continued participation in that pathway will be based on course completion, dual credit completion if applicable, and industry credential completion if applicable.  Students that enroll in and complete dual college credit and/or earn industry credentials will get first option to take the next level of a pathway course.  

CTE pathways are grouped into a Career Cluster of related studies.

For additional information on courses in a pathway, look at the tab for the career cluster listed with pathway in the tables below.

Career Cluster:  Agriculture Related Pathways

Ag Mechanical and Engineering

Cluster: Agriculture
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Ag Mechanical and Engineering 7117 Principles of Agriculture 5088 Agriculture Power, Structure, and Technology 71112 Agriculture Structures Fabrication and Design 7228 Agriculture Mechanization and Technology Capstone

Agri-Science – Plants or Animals (Technical Certificate option)

Cluster: Agriculture
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A (1 hour)

Concentrator B (1 hour) (2 hour block remote site option for technical certificate)

Capstone (3 hour block remote site option TC)
Agri-Science – Plants or Animals 7117 Principles of Agriculture 5008 Animal Science 5070 Advanced Life Science, Animals (L) 7262 Agricultural Research Capstone
5170 Plant and Soil Science 5074 Advanced Life Science, Plants and Soils (L)

Precision Agriculture (Technical Certificate)

Cluster: Agriculture
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A

Concentrator B

(2 hour block remote site)

Capstone (3 hour block remote site)
Precision Agriculture 7117 Principles of Agriculture 7116 Precision Agriculture 7113 Crop Management 7236 Precision Agriculture Capstone
Courses will take place first & second period with SRT included in Travel time. 7238 Agribusiness Capstone

Career Cluster:  Architecture and Construction

Construction Trades – Carpentry

Cluster: Architecture and Construction

Principles

Concentrator A

Concentrator B   (3 hour block) Remote site

Capstone (3 hours) Remote site
7130 Principles of Construction Trades 7123 Construction Trades: General Carpentry 7122 Construction Trades: Framing and Finishing 7242 Construction Trades Capstone

Facilities Maintenance

Cluster: Architecture and Construction
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Facilities Management 7130 Principles of Construction Trades 7258 Building and Facilities Maintenance Fundamentals 7286 Advanced Building and Facilities Maintenance 7287 Building and Facilities Maintenance Capstone

Career Cluster:  Arts, AV Tech, and Communications

Digital Design

Cluster: Arts, AV Tech and Communications
Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
7141 Digital Design Graphics 7136 Professional Photography and Videography 7246 Digital Design Capstone
5550 Graphic Design and Layout
7138 Interactive Media Design

Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising (TAM)

Cluster: Arts, AV Tech and Communications
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A

Concentrator B  (2 hour block)

Capstone (2 hours)
TAM-Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising 7301 Principles of Fashion and Textiles 7302 Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising 7303 Advanced Textiles 7304 Fashion and Textiles Capstone

Radio and Television

Cluster: Arts, AV Tech and Communications
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Radio and Television 7139 Principles of Broadcasting 7306 Audio and Video Production Essentials 7307 Mass Media Production 7380 Radio& TV Broadcasting Capstone

Career Cluster:  Business Management, Marketing, and Finance

Business Administration

Cluster: Business Management, Marketing, and Finance
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Business Administration 4562 Principles of Business Management 7143 Management Fundamentals 4524 Accounting Fundamentals 7256 Business Administration Capstone

Accounting

Cluster: Business Management, Marketing, and Finance
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Accounting 4562 Principles of Business Management 4524 Accounting Fundamentals 4522 Advanced Accounting 7252 Accounting Capstone

Marketing and Sales

Cluster: Business Management, Marketing, and Finance
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Marketing and Sales 4562 Principles of Business Management 5914 Marketing Fundamentals 5918 Strategic Marketing 7201 Business Management Capstone
7145 Digital Marketing

Entrepreneurship

Cluster: Business Management, Marketing, and Finance
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Entrepreneurship 7154 Principles of Entrepreneurship 7148 New Venture Development 7147 Small Business Operations 7201 Business Management Capstone

Business Operations and Technology

Cluster: Business Management, Marketing, and Finance
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Business Operations and Technology 7153 Principles of Business Operations and Technology 7144 Business Office Communications 7146 Digital Data Applications 7254 Business Operations and Technology Capstone

Career Cluster: Education and Training

Early Childhood Education

Cluster: Education and Training
Pathway

Principles

Concentrator A  (2 hour block)

Concentrator B

Capstone (3 hour block)

Early Childhood Education 7160 Principles of Early Childhood Education 7158 Early Childhood Education Curriculum 7159 Early Childhood Education Guidance 7259 Early Childhood Education Capstone

Education Professions

Cluster: Education and Training
Pathway

Principles

Concentrator A  (2 hour block for observations)

Concentrator B (1 hour)

Capstone (3 hours)

Remote Site

Education Professions 7161 Principles of Teaching 7157 Child and Adolescent Development 7162 Teaching and Learning 7267 Education Professions Capstone

Career Cluster: Health Sciences

Certified Nursing Aid (CNA) Pre-Nursing

Cluster: Health Sciences
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour)

Concentrator B

Capstone  (3 hour block) Remote site

Certified Nursing Aid (CNA) Pre-Nursing 7168 Principles of Healthcare 5274 Medical Terminology 7166 Healthcare Specialist: CNA 7255 Healthcare Specialist Capstone

Pathway:  Certified Clinical Medical Assistant

Cluster: Health Sciences
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour)

Concentrator B

Capstone  (3 hour block) Remote site

Certified Clinical Medical Assistant 7168 Principles of Healthcare 5274 Medical Terminology 7164 Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) 7255 Healthcare Specialist Capstone

Emergency Medical Technician

Cluster: Health Sciences
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour)

Concentrator B

Capstone (3 hour block) Remote site evening class

Emergency Medical Technician 7168 Principles of Healthcare 5274 Medical Terminology 7165 Emergency Medical Tech 7255 Healthcare Specialist Capstone

Career Cluster: Hospitality

Culinary Arts – Baking and Pastry

Cluster: Hospitality and Tourism
Pathway

Principles

Concentrator A (2 hour block)

Concentrator B

Capstone  (2 hour block)

Culinary Arts – Baking and Pastry 7173 Principles of Culinary and Hospitality 7171 Nutrition 7169 Culinary Arts 7235 Baking and Pastry Capstone

Human Services

Cluster: Human Services
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Human Services 7176 Principles of Human Services 7174 Understanding Diversity 7177 Relationships and Emotions 7241 Human Services Capstone

Career Cluster:  Information Technology

Information Technology Operations

Cluster: Information Tech
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Information Technology Operations 7183 Principles of Computing 7180 Information Technology Fundamentals 7181 Networking and Cybersecurity Operations 7245 IT Operations: IT Support Capstone

Software Development

Cluster: Information Tech
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Software Development 7183 Principles of Computing 7185 Website and Database Development 7184 Software Development 7253 Software Development Capstone

Career Cluster:  Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Pathway:  Engineering

Cluster: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Engineering 4802 Introduction to Engineering Design 5644 Principles of Engineering 5538 Digital Electronics 5698 Engineering Design and Development
5650 Civil Engineering and Architecture
5534 Computer Integrated Manufacturing

Design Technology

Cluster: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Design Technology 4802 Introduction to Engineering Design 7196 Mechanical and Architectural Design 7202 Manufacturing Principles and Design 7225 Architectural Design Capstone
7197 BIM Architecture 7223 Mechanical Design Capstone

Computer Science

Cluster: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Computer Science 7183 Principles of Computing 7351 Topics in Computer Science 7352 Computer Science 7353 Computer Science Capstone

Electronics and Computer Technology

Cluster: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Electronics and Computer Technology 4802 Introduction to Engineering Design 7361 Electronic Fundamentals 5538 Digital Electronics 7362 Electronics and Computer Technology Capstone

Career Cluster: Transportation

Pathway:  Automotive Services

Cluster: Transportation
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A

Concentrator B  (2 hour block)

Capstone (2 hours)
Automotive Services 7213 Principles of Automotive Services 7205 Brake Systems 7212 Steering and Suspensions 7375 Automotive Service Capstone

Automotive Collision Repair

Cluster: Transportation
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A

Concentrator B  (2 hour block)

Capstone (2 hours)
Automotive Collision Repair 7215 Principles of Collision Repair 7204 Automotive Body Repair 7206 Plastic Body Repair and Paint Fundamentals 7380 Collision Repair Capstone

 

Introductory/Exploratory Courses


4796 Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics

INT ADV MFTG

Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics focuses on manufacturing systems with an introduction to advanced manufacturing and logistics and their relationship to society, individuals, and the environment. Students apply the skills and knowledge of using modern manufacturing processes to obtain resources and change them into industrial materials, industrial products and consumer products. Students investigate the properties of engineered materials. Students study six major types of material processes: casting and molding; forming; separating; conditioning; finishing; and assembling. After gaining a working knowledge of these materials, students are introduced to advanced manufacturing,

logistics, and business principles that are utilized in today’s advanced manufacturing industry. Students gain a basic understanding of tooling, electrical skills, operation skills, inventory principles, MSDS’s, chart and graph reading and MSSC concepts. There is also an emphasis placed on the flow process principles, material movement, safety, and related business operations. Students have the opportunity to develop the characteristics employers seek as well as skills that will help them in future endeavors.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

5056 Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

INT AGFNR

Introduction to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources is a one or two semester course that is highly recommended as a prerequisite to and as a foundation for all other agricultural classes. Through hands- on learning activities, students are encouraged to investigate areas of agriculture. Students are introduced to the following areas of agriculture: animal science, plant and soil science, food science, horticultural science, agricultural business management, natural resources, agriculture power, structure, and technology, careers in agriculture, leadership, and supervised agricultural experience. An activity and project-based approach is used along with team building to enhance the effectiveness of the student learning activities.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

4792 Introduction to Construction

INT CONST

Introduction to Construction is a course that will offer hands-on activities and real-world experiences related to the skills essential in residential, commercial and civil building construction. During the course students will be introduced to the history and traditions of construction trades. The student will also learn and apply knowledge of the care and safe use of hand and power tools as related to each trade. In addition, students are introduced to blueprint reading, applied math, basic tools and equipment, and safety. Students will demonstrate building construction techniques, including concrete and masonry, framing, electrical, plumbing, dry walling, HVAC, and painting as developed locally in accordance with available space and technologies. Students learn how architectural ideas are converted into projects and how projects are managed during a construction project in this course. Students study construction technology topics such as preparing a site, doing earthwork, setting footings and foundations, building the superstructure, enclosing the structure, installing systems, finishing the structure, and completing the site. Students also investigate topics related to the purchasing and maintenance of structures, special purpose facilities, green construction and construction careers.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

4790 Introduction to Communications

INT COMM

Introduction to Communications is a course designed to provide a foundational knowledge of identifying and using modern communication to exchange messages and information. This course explores the application of the tools, materials, and techniques used to design, produce, use, and assess systems of communication. Students will produce graphic and electronic media as they apply communication technologies. This course will also explore the various technical processes used to link ideas and people through the use of electronic and graphic media. Major goals of this course include an overview of communication technology; the way it has evolved, how messages are designed and produced, and how people may profit from creating information services and products. Students will explore mass media communication processes including radio and television broadcasting, publishing and printing activities, telecommunication networks, recording services, computer and data processing networks, and other related systems. Students will use the design process to solve design projects in each communication area.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

5350 Introduction to Housing and Interior Design

INT HSINT DES

Introduction to Housing and Interior Design is an introductory course essential for those students interested in academic enrichment or a career within the housing, interior design, or furnishings industry. This course addresses the selection and planning of designed spaces to meet the needs, wants, values and lifestyles of individuals, families, clients, and communities. Housing decisions, resources and options will be explored including factors affecting housing choices and the types of housing available. Developmental influences on housing and interior environments will also be considered. Basic historical architectural styling and basic furniture styles will be explored as well as basic identification of the elements and principles of design. Design and space planning involve evaluating floor plans and reading construction documents while learning to create safe, functional, and aesthetic spaces. Presentation techniques will be practiced to thoroughly communicate design ideas. Visual arts concepts including aesthetics, criticism, history and production, are addressed. Direct, concrete mathematics proficiencies will be applied. A project-based approach will be utilized requiring higher order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes as housing and interior design content is integrated into the design of interior spaces while meeting specific project criteria. This course provides the foundation for further study and careers in the architecture, construction, housing, interior design, and furnishings industries.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9,10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

5380 Introduction to Fashion & Textiles

FSHNTX

Introduction to Fashion and Textiles is an introductory course for those students interested in academic enrichment or a career in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry. This course addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the fashion, textile, and apparel arena. The course includes the study of personal, academic, and career success; careers in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry; factors influencing the merchandising and selection of fashion, textile, and apparel goods and their properties, design, and production; and consumer skills. A project-based approach integrates instruction and laboratory experiences including application of the elements and principles of design, aesthetics, criticism, history and production; selection, production, alteration, repair, and maintenance of apparel and textile products; product research, development, and testing; and application of technical tools and equipment utilized in the industry. Direct, concrete mathematics proficiencies will be applied. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in fashion, textile, and apparel-related careers.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma

4518 Introduction to Business

INTO BUSS

Introduction to Business introduces students to the world of business, including the concepts, functions, and skills required for meeting the challenges of operating a business in the twenty- first century on a local, national, and/or international scale. The course covers business management, entrepreneurship, marketing fundamentals, and business ethics and law. The course develops business vocabulary and provides an overview of business and the role that business plays in economic, social, and political environments.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

5967 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

INTO ENTR

Introduction to Entrepreneurship provides an overview of what it means to be an entrepreneur. Students will learn about starting and operating a business, marketing products and services, and how to find resources to help in the development of a new venture. This course is ideal for students interested in starting their own art gallery, salon, restaurant, etc.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

4512 Business Math

BUS MATH

Business Math is a course designed to prepare students for roles as entrepreneurs, producers, and business leaders by developing abilities and skills that are part of any business environment. A solid understanding of math including algebra, basic geometry, statistics, and probability provides the necessary foundation for students interested in careers in business and skilled trade areas. The content includes mathematical operations related to accounting, banking and finance, marketing, and management. Instructional strategies should include simulations, guest speakers, tours, Internet research, and business experiences.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: Algebra I
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as an elective or directed elective for all diplomas
  • Fulfills a Mathematics requirement for the General Diploma or Certificate of Completion only.
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

5340 Advanced Nutrition and Wellness

ADV NTRN WEL

Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is a course which provides an extensive study of nutrition. This course is recommended for all students wanting to improve their nutrition and learn how nutrition affects the body across the lifespan. Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is an especially appropriate course for students interested in careers in the medical field, athletic training and dietetics. This course builds on the foundation established in Nutrition and Wellness, which is a required prerequisite. This is a project- based course; utilizing higher-order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes. Topics include extensive study of major nutrients, nutritional standards across the lifespan, influences on nutrition/food choices, technological and scientific influences, and career exploration in this field.

Laboratory experiences will be utilized to develop food handling and preparation skills; attention will be given to nutrition, food safety and sanitation. This course is the second in a sequence of courses that provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition, food, and wellness.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Nutrition and Wellness
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

5360 Advanced Child Development

ADVCHLDDEV

Advanced Child Development is for those students interested in life foundations, academic enrichment, and/or careers related to knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This

course addresses issues of child development from prenatal to age eight (grade three). It includes the Child Development content. Advanced Child Development includes the study of professional and ethical issues in child development; child growth and development; child development theories, research, and best practices; child health and wellness; teaching and guiding children; special conditions affecting children; and career exploration in child development and nurturing. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9,10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

5366 Human Development and Wellness

HUMAN DEV

Human Development and Wellness is valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers impacted by individuals’ physical, social, emotional, and moral development and wellness across the lifespan. Major topics include principles of human development and wellness; impacts of family on human development and wellness; factors that affect human development and wellness; practices that promote human development and wellness; managing resources and services related to human development and wellness; and career exploration in human development and wellness. Life events and contemporary issues addressed in this course include (but are not limited to) change; stress; abuse; personal safety; and relationships among lifestyle choices, health and wellness conditions, and diseases. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate the study of these topics. Authentic applications through service learning are encouraged.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as one of the FACS courses a student can take to waive the Health & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses.

5272 Introduction to Health Science Careers

INTRO HS CAREERS

Introduction to Health Science Careers is an exploratory course designed to provide students with an opportunity to investigate all aspects of the health science industry. Students will receive an introduction to healthcare systems and examine a variety of pathways in health science, and reflect on their own knowledge, skills and interests, to begin to narrow the areas within health science they want to continue exploring, in preparation for further study in Health Science I

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Preparing for College and Careers
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, maximum of 2 credits
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

5438 Introduction to Culinary Arts and Hospitality

INT CUL HOS

Introduction to Culinary Arts and Hospitality is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway, in order to build basic culinary arts knowledge and skills. It is especially appropriate for students with an interest in careers related to Hospitality, Tourism, and Culinary Arts. A project- based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended. Topics include basic culinary skills in the foodservice industry, safety and sanitation, nutrition, customer relations and career investigation. Students are able to explore this industry and examine their own career goals in light of their findings. Laboratory experiences that emphasize industry practices and develop basic skills are required components of this course.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Nutrition and Wellness; Advanced Nutrition and Wellness
  • Credits: 1-2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

4794 Introduction to Design Processes

INT DES PRO

Introduction to Design Processes is a course that specializes in modern design and engineering processes with a focus on creative problem solving in developing, testing, communicating, and presenting post-evaluation of products. Students use the design process to analyze research, develop ideas, and produce products solutions. This process gives a framework through which they design, manufacture, test, and present their ideas. Students will demonstrate and utilize design principles and elements for visual presentation. Designing aspects will also cover aesthetics, ergonomics, the environment, safety, and production. The design process is a core-learning tool for many courses enabling the student to solve problems in a systematic, logical and creative manner. Students develop a good understanding of the way the process helps them think creatively and develop aesthetic ideas.

The design process encourages the students to engage in higher level thinking to create solutions for many types of problems.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

4800 Computers in Design & Production

COMP DES

Computers in Design and Production is a course that specializes in using modern technological processes, computers, design, and production systems in the production of products and structures through the use of automated production systems. Emphasis is placed on using modern technologies and on developing career related skills for electronics, manufacturing, precision machining, welding, and architecture career pathways. Students apply ingenuity using tools, materials, processes, and resources to create solutions as it applies in the electronics, manufacturing, precision machining, welding, and architecture. The content and activities should be developed locally in accordance with available advanced technologies in the school. Course content should address major technological content related to topics such as: Architectural drawing and print design, design documentation using CAD systems; assignments involving the interface of CAD, CNC, CAM, and CIM technologies; computer simulation of products and systems; publishing of various media; animation and related multimedia applications; 3-D modeling of products or structures; digital creation and editing of graphics and audio files; control technologies; and automation in the modern workplace.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum

4803 Introduction to Computer Science

INTO CS

Introduction to Computer Science allows students to explore the world of computer science. Students will gain a broad understanding of the areas composing computer science. Additionally, there is a focus on the areas of computer programming, gaming/mobile development, and artificial intelligence/robotics.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 to 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

4798 Introduction to Transportation

INT TRANS

Introduction to Transportation is an introductory course designed to help students become familiar with fundamental principles in modes of land, sea, air, and space transportation, including basic mechanical skills and processes involved in transportation of people, cargo, and goods. Students will gain and apply knowledge and skills in the safe application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems as it relates to the transportation industries. Content of this course includes the study of how transportation impacts individuals, society, and the environment. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant transportation related activities, problems, and settings.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster: Advanced Manufacturing


Pathway: Digital Manufacturing – Industry 4.0

Cluster: Advanced Manufacturing
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A      (1 hour) Concentrator B        (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Digital Manufacturing – Industry 4.0 7220 Principles of Industry 4.0 -Smart Manufacturing 4728 Robotics Design and Innovation 7100 Smart Manufacturing Systems 7222 Industry 4.0 – Smart Manufacturing Capstone

   

7220 Principles of Industry 4.0 – Smart Manufacturing

PRIN DIG MANF

Principles of Industry 4.0 introduces students to the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). Students will explore Industry 4.0 technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), human to robot collaboration, big data, safety, electrical, sensors, digital integration, fluid power, robot operation, measurement, CAD, CNC, additive manufacturing, print reading, and technical mathematics. Students will complete hands- on labs, virtual simulations, projects, and critical thinking assignments to help prepare for SACA C-101 Certified Industry 4.0 Associate I – Basic Operations certification exam.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

4728 Robotics Design and Innovation

RDI

The Robotics Design and Innovation course is designed to introduce students to technology that is revolutionizing modern manufacturing and logistic centers across global markets. Students will explore careers that are related to the fourth industrial revolution and be introduced to the emerging technologies that make the manufacturing world ever changing. These technologies include; mechatronics, CAD/CAM, robots, programmable automation, cloud technologies, networking, big data and analytics. Students will design a part to be mass produced using processes such as additive and subtractive manufacturing, while utilizing lean manufacturing concepts. The course will prepare students for the SACA, C-102 Certified Industry 4.0 Associate

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Industry 4.0 – Smart Manufacturing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7100 Smart Manufacturing Systems

DIG MAN SYS

Smart Manufacturing Systems will deepen students’ technical skills by studying the electrical system required to support an Industry 4.0 manufacturing system and building on skills learned in Principles of Industry 4.0 and Robotics Design and Innovation. Topics include Industry 4.0 technologies such as data analytics, cyber security, and smart sensors. Students will work on a 4-6 student team to build a working prototype of an Industry 4.0 system. Highlights include: Variable Frequency Drives, PLC troubleshooting, Cyber Security, Smart Sensors, and Smart network communications.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Industry 4.0 – Smart Manufacturing; Robotics Design and Innovation
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7222 Industry 4.0 – Smart Manufacturing Capstone

DIG MANF CAP

Industry 4.0 – Smart Manufacturing Capstone introduces the basic theory, operation, and programming of industrial robots and their applications through simulations and hands-on laboratory activities. Basic theory, operation, and programming of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) will be emphasized in this course along with how automation devices may be integrated with other machines. Multiple industry standard certifications in the field of robotics and automation will be available depending on the length of the course. As a capstone course, students are encouraged to participate in an intensive, embedded work-based learning experience.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Industry 4.0 – Smart Manufacturing; Robotics Design and Innovation; Smart Manufacturing Systems
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway:  Industrial Automation and Robotics

Cluster: Advanced Manufacturing
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B       (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Industrial Automation and Robotics 7108 Principles of
Advanced
Manufacturing
7103 Advanced Manufacturing Technology 7106 Mechatronics Systems 7224 Automation and Robotics Capstone

7108 Principles of Advanced Manufacturing

PRIN ADV MAN

Principles of Advanced Manufacturing is a course that includes classroom and laboratory experiences in Industrial Technology and Manufacturing Trends. Domains include safety and impact, manufacturing essentials, lean manufacturing, design principles, and careers in advanced manufacturing. Hands-on projects and team activities will allow students to apply learning on the latest industry technologies.

Work-based learning experiences and industry partnerships are highly encouraged for an authentic industry experience.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7103 Advanced Manufacturing Technology

ADV MAN TECH

Advanced Manufacturing Technology introduces manufacturing processes and practices used in manufacturing environments. The course also covers key electrical principles, including current, voltage, resistance, power, inductance, capacitance, and transformers, along with basic mechanical and fluid power principles. Topics include, types of production, production materials, machining and tooling, manufacturing planning, production control, and product distribution will be covered. Students will be expected to understand the product life cycle from conception through distribution. This course also focuses on technologies used in production processes. Basic power systems, energy transfer systems, machine operation and control will be explored. This course will use lecture, lab, online simulation and programming to prepare students for Certified Production Technician Testing through Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC).

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Advanced Manufacturing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7106 Mechatronics Systems

MECH SYS

Mechatronics Systems covers the basic electrical and mechanical components and functions of a complex mechatronics system. Through a systems approach, students will learn about mechanical components which lead and support the energy through a mechanical system to increase efficiency and to reduce wear and tear. By understanding the complete system, students will learn and apply troubleshooting strategies to identify, localize and (where possible) to correct malfunctions. Preventive maintenance of mechanical elements and electrical drives as well as safety issues within the system will also be discussed.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Advanced Manufacturing; Advanced Manufacturing Technology
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7224 Industrial Automation and Robotics Capstone

AUTO ROB CAP

The Automation and Robotics Capstone course focuses on the installation, maintenance, and repair of industrial robots. Students will also learn the basics of pneumatic, electro pneumatic and hydraulic control circuits as well as the basic theory, fundamentals of digital logic, and programming of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) in a complex mechatronic system. Students will learn to identify malfunctioning robots and to apply troubleshooting strategies to identify and localize problems caused by pneumatic and hydraulic control circuits and PLC hardware. Completing the capstone course will provide students the opportunity to earn a postsecondary certificate and will prepare students to take nationally recognized industry certification exams. Hands-on projects and team activities will allow students to apply learning on the latest industry technologies. Extended work-based learning experiences and industry partnerships are highly encouraged for an authentic industry experience.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Advanced Manufacturing; Advanced Manufacturing Technology; Mechatronics Systems
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway:  Industrial Maintenance Technician – Electrical 

Cluster: Advanced Manufacturing
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B          (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Industrial Maintenance Technician – Electrical 7108 Principles of
Advanced
Manufacturing
7103 Advanced Manufacturing Technology 7102 Industrial Electrical Fundamentals 7260 Industrial Electrical Capstone

7108 Principles of Advanced Manufacturing

PRIN ADV MAN

Principles of Advanced Manufacturing is a course that includes classroom and laboratory experiences in Industrial Technology and Manufacturing Trends. Domains include safety and impact, manufacturing essentials, lean manufacturing, design principles, and careers in advanced manufacturing. Hands-on projects and team activities will allow students to apply learning on the latest industry technologies.

Work-based learning experiences and industry partnerships are highly encouraged for an authentic industry experience.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas 

7103 Advanced Manufacturing Technology

ADV MAN TECH

Advanced Manufacturing Technology introduces manufacturing processes and practices used in manufacturing environments. The course also covers key electrical principles, including current, voltage, resistance, power, inductance, capacitance, and transformers, along with basic mechanical and fluid power principles. Topics include, types of production, production materials, machining and tooling, manufacturing planning, production control, and product distribution will be covered. Students will be expected to understand the product life cycle from conception through distribution. This course also focuses on technologies used in production processes. Basic power systems, energy transfer systems, machine operation and control will be explored. This course will use lecture, lab, online simulation and programming to prepare students for Certified Production Technician Testing through Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC).

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Advanced Manufacturing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7102 Industrial Electrical Fundamentals

IND ELC FUN

The Industrial Electrical Fundamentals course will introduce students to the National Electric Code and its application in designing and installing electrical circuits, selecting wiring materials and devices, and choosing wiring methods. Students will also gain a general understanding of common types of electric motors.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Advanced Manufacturing; Advanced Manufacturing Technology
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7260 Industrial Electrical Capstone

IND ELEC CAP

The Industrial Electrical Capstone course is designed to provide an understanding of circuits using alternating current and the motor operation as well as the operation and programming of programmable logic controllers (PLC). The course will also examine the electrical components in a complex mechatronic system. This course will give each student a general understanding of common types of electric motors, extending from the small shaded pole fan motors to the large three-phase motors. This course will use lecture, lab, online simulation and programming to prepare students for the

C-207 Programmable Controller Systems 1 Certification through Smart Automation Certification Alliance (SACA).

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Advanced Manufacturing; Advanced Manufacturing Technology; Industrial Electrical Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

 

Pathway:  Industrial Maintenance Technician – Mechanical

Cluster: Advanced Manufacturing
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B          (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Industrial Maintenance Technician – Mechanical 7108 Principles of
Advanced
Manufacturing
7103 Advanced Manufacturing Technology 7104 Industrial Mechanical Fundamentals 7261   Industrial Maintenance Capstone

7108 Principles of Advanced Manufacturing

PRIN ADV MAN

Principles of Advanced Manufacturing is a course that includes classroom and laboratory experiences in Industrial Technology and Manufacturing Trends. Domains include safety and impact, manufacturing essentials, lean manufacturing, design principles, and careers in advanced manufacturing. Hands-on projects and team activities will allow students to apply learning on the latest industry technologies.

Work-based learning experiences and industry partnerships are highly encouraged for an authentic industry experience.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas 

7103 Advanced Manufacturing Technology

ADV MAN TECH

Advanced Manufacturing Technology introduces manufacturing processes and practices used in manufacturing environments. The course also covers key electrical principles, including current, voltage, resistance, power, inductance, capacitance, and transformers, along with basic mechanical and fluid power principles. Topics include, types of production, production materials, machining and tooling, manufacturing planning, production control, and product distribution will be covered. Students will be expected to understand the product life cycle from conception through distribution. This course also focuses on technologies used in production processes. Basic power systems, energy transfer systems, machine operation and control will be explored. This course will use lecture, lab, online simulation and programming to prepare students for Certified Production Technician Testing through Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC).

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Advanced Manufacturing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7104 Industrial Maintenance Fundamentals

IND MAIN FUN

Industrial Maintenance Fundamentals introduces students to fundamental Welding and Machining skills. Students will be introduced to basic skills in welding, cutting and brazing, and machine tooling that are applicable in a wide variety of trade professions. Specifically, students will learn safe practices in oxy- fuel and Arc welding processes along with experience in using turning, milling, and grinding applications.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Advanced Manufacturing; Advanced Manufacturing Technology
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7261 Industrial Maintenance Capstone

IND MAINT CAP

The Industrial Maintenance Capstone course examines the procedures for the removal, repair and installation of machine components. The methods of installation, lubrication practices, and maintenance procedures for industrial machinery are analyzed. Additionally the course may cover the mechanical components and electrical drives in a complex mechatronic system. By understanding the inner workings of the complete system, students will learn and apply troubleshooting strategies to identify, localize and (where possible) to correct malfunctions. Preventive maintenance of mechanical elements and electrical drives as well as safety issues within the system will be discussed. This course will use lecture, lab, online simulation and programming to prepare students for C-210 Mechanical Power Systems I Certification through Smart Automation Certification Alliance (SACA).

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Advanced Manufacturing; Advanced Manufacturing Technology; Industrial Maintenance Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway: Precision Machining

Cluster: Advanced Manufacturing
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A 

Concentrator B         (2 hour block)

Capstone (2 hours)
Precision Machining 7109 Principles of
Precision Machining
7105 Precision Machining Fundamentals 7107 Advanced Precision Machining 7219 Precision Machining Capstone

7109 Principles of Precision Machining

PRIN PREC MACH

Principles of Precision Machining will provide students with a basic understanding of the processes used to produce industrial goods. Classroom instruction and labs will focus on shop safety, measurement, layout, blueprint reading, shop math, metallurgy, basic hand tools, milling, turning, grinding, and sawing operations. This course prepares the student for the optional National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Measurement, Materials, & Safety certification that may be required for college dual credit.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7105 Precision Machining Fundamentals

MACH FUN

Precision Machining Fundamentals will build a foundation in conventional milling and turning. Students will be instructed in the classroom on topics of shop safety, theory, industrial terminology, and calculations. Lab work will consist of the setup and operation of vertical and/or horizontal milling machines and engine lathes. This course prepares the student for the optional National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Milling I certification that may be required for college dual credit.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Precision Machining
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course
  • It is recommended that Precision Machining program of study be taught in a 2-3 period block of time. VU dual credit requires that Precision Machining Fundamentals and Advanced Precision Machining be completed concurrently

7107 Advanced Precision Machining

PREC MACH

Advanced Precision Machining will build upon the Turning and Milling processes learned in Precision Machining Fundamentals and will build a foundation in abrasive process machines. Students will be instructed in the classroom on topics of shop safety, theory, industrial terminology, and calculations associated with abrasives. Lab work will consist of the setup and operation of bench grinders and surface grinders. Additionally students will be introduced to Computerized Numeric Controlled (CNC) setup, operations and programming. This course prepares the student for the optional National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Grinding I certification that may be required for college dual credit.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Precision Machining; Precision Machining Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course
  • It is recommended that Precision Machining program of study be taught in a 2-3 period block of time.
  • VU dual credit requires that Precision Machining Fundamentals and Advanced Precision Machining be completed concurrently

7219 Precision Machining Capstone

PREC MACH CAP

Precision Machining Capstone is an in-depth study of skills learned in Precision Machining I, with a stronger focus on CNC setup/operation/programming. Students will be introduced to two axis CNC lathe programming and three axis CNC milling machine programming. Develops the theory of programming in the classroom with applications of the program accomplished on industry-type machines. Studies terminology of coordinates, cutter paths, angle cutting, and linear and circular interpolation. Classroom activities will concentrate on precision set-up and inspection work, as well as machine shop calculations. Students will develop skills in advanced machining and measuring parts involving tighter tolerances and more complex geometry. A continued focus on safety will also be presented.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Precision Machining; Precision Machining Fundamentals; Advanced Precision Machining
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

Pathway:  Welding Technology

Cluster: Advanced Manufacturing
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A 

Concentrator B   (2 hour block)

Capstone (2 hours)
Welding Technology 7110 Principles of Welding Technology 7111 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 7101 Gas Welding Processes 7226 Welding Technology Capstone

7110 Principles of Welding Technology

PRIN WEL TCH

Principles of Welding Technology includes classroom and laboratory experiences that develop a variety of skills in oxy-fuel cutting and basic welding. This course is designed for individuals who intend to make a career as a Welder, Technician, Designer, Researcher, or Engineer. Emphasis is placed on safety at all times. OSHA standards and guidelines endorsed by the American Welding Society (AWS) are used.

Instructional activities emphasize properties of metals, safety issues, blueprint reading, electrical principles, welding symbols, and mechanical drawing through projects and exercises that teach students how to weld and be prepared for postsecondary and career success.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7111 Shielded Metal Arc Welding

SHLD MAW

Shielded Metal Arc Welding involves the theory and application of the Shielded Metal Arc Welding process. Process theory will include basic electricity, power sources, electrode selection, and all aspects pertaining to equipment operation and maintenance. Laboratory welds will be performed in basic weld joints with a variety of electrodes in the flat, horizontal and vertical positions. Emphasis will be placed on developing the basic skills necessary to comply with AWS industry standards.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Welding Technology
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

7101 Gas Welding Processes

GAS WEL PRC

Gas Welding Processes is designed to cover the operation of Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG) equipment. This will include all settings, adjustments and maintenance needed to weld with a wire feed system.

Instruction on both short-arc and spray-arc transfer methods will be covered. Tee, lap, and open groove joints will be done in all positions with solid, fluxcore, and aluminum wire. Test plates will be made for progress evaluation. Schools may choose to offer the course as a comprehensive MIG Welding course or a combination of introductory MIG and TIG Welding operations.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Welding Technology
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Schools may choose to cover both introductory MIG and TIG Welding. This configuration is available for dual credit through ITCC.

7226 Welding Technology Capstone

WELD TECH CAP

The Welding Technology Capstone course builds upon the knowledge and skills developed in Welding Fundamentals, Shielded Metal Arc Welding, and Gas Metal Arc Welding by developing advanced welding skills in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (TIG), Pipe Welding, and Fabrication. As a capstone course, students should have the opportunity to apply their knowledge and use skills through an intensive work-based learning experience.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Welding Technology; Shielded Metal Arc Welding; Gas Welding Processes
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster:  Architecture and Construction


Pathway:  Construction Trades – Carpentry

Cluster: Architecture and Construction
Pathway

Principles

Concentrator A

Concentrator B   (3 hour block) Remote site

Capstone (3 hours) Remote site
Construction Trades – Carpentry 7130 Principles of Construction Trades 7123 Construction Trades: General Carpentry 7122 Construction Trades: Framing and Finishing 7242 Construction Trades Capstone
Carpenters Union admittance scholarship program available.  Financial scholarship also available for students pursuing construction degree.
7130 Principles of Construction Trades
PRIN CON TR

Principles of Construction Trades prepares students with the basic skills needed to continue in a construction trade field. Topics will include an introduction to the types and uses for common hand and power tools, learn the types and basic terminology associated with construction drawings, and basic safety. Additionally students will study the roles of individuals and companies within the construction industry and reinforce mathematical and communication skills necessary to be successful in the construction field.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7123 Construction Trades: General Carpentry
CON TRD GC

Construction Trades: General Carpentry builds upon the skills learned in the Principles of Construction Trades and examines the basics of framing. This includes studying the procedures for laying out and constructing floor systems, wall systems, ceiling joist and roof framing, and basic stair layout.

Additionally, students will be introduced to building envelope systems.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Construction Trades; or Principles of Architecture, Engineering and Construction
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7122 Construction Trades: Framing and Finishing
CON TRD FR FIN

Construction Trades: Framing and Finishing prepares students with advanced framing skills along with interior and exterior finishing techniques. Topics include roofing applications, thermal and moisture protection, exterior finishing, cold-formed steel framing, drywall installation and finishing, doors and door hardware, suspended ceilings, window, door, floor, and ceiling trim, and cabinet installation.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Construction Trades; Construction Trades: General Carpentry
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7242 Construction Trades Capstone
CSTR TR CAP

The Construction Trades Capstone course covers the basics of electricity and working with concrete. Electrical topics include the National Electric Code, electrical safety, electrical circuits, basic electrical construction drawings, and residential electrical services. Students may also gain an understanding of concrete properties, foundations, slab-on-grades, and vertical and horizontal formwork. The course prepares students for the NCCER Carpentry Forms Level 3 and Electrical Level 1certificates.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Construction Trades; Construction Trades: General Carpentry; and Construction Trades: Framing and Finishing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway: Facilities Maintenance

Cluster: Architecture and Construction
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Facilities Management 7130 Principles of Construction Trades 7258 Building and Facilities Maintenance Fundamentals 7286 Advanced Building and Facilities Maintenance 7287 Building and Facilities Maintenance Capstone
7130F Principles of Construction Trades
PRIN CON TR

Principles of Construction Trades prepares students with the basic skills needed to continue in a construction trade field. Topics will include an introduction to the types and uses for common hand and power tools, learn the types and basic terminology associated with construction drawings, and basic safety. Additionally students will study the roles of individuals and companies within the construction industry and reinforce mathematical and communication skills necessary to be successful in the construction field.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7285 Building and Facilities Maintenance Fundamentals
BLDG FAC MAINT FUND

Building and Facilities Maintenance Fundamentals prepares students to complete basic maintenance tasks like minor construction repairs and be able to repair and/or replace various building materials including flooring, wall covering, hardware, lighting and plumbing fixtures.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Construction Trades
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
7286 Advanced Building and Facilities Maintenance
ADV BLDG FAC MAINT

Advanced Building and Facilities Maintenance prepares students to complete more advanced repairs involving a buildings mechanical system including electrical, HVAC, and plumbing.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Construction Trades; Building and Facilities Maintenance Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
7287 Building and Facilities Maintenance Capstone
BLDG FAC MAINT CAP

Building and Facilities Maintenance Capstone will continue to develop students maintenance skills ideally through a work-based learning experience. Students will also explore additional topics like processing work orders, fair housing regulation compliance, environmental and regulation compliance, reporting and documentation of maintenance activities, and implementation of a preventive maintenance schedule.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Construction Trades; Building and Facilities Maintenance Fundamentals; and Advanced Building and Facilities Maintenance
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster:  Arts, AV Tech, and Communications


Pathway:  Digital Design

Cluster: Arts, AV Tech and Communications
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Digital Design 7140 Principles of Digital Design 7141 Digital Design Graphics 7136 Professional Photography and Videography 7246 Digital Design Capstone
5550 Graphic Design and Layout
7138 Interactive Media Design
7140 Principles of Digital Design
PRIN DIG DES

Principles of Digital Design introduces students to fundamental design theory. Investigations into design theory and color dynamics will provide experiences in applying design theory, ideas and creative problem solving, critical peer evaluation, and presentation skills. Students will have the opportunity to apply the design theory through an understanding of basic photographic theory and technique. Topics will include image capture, processing, various output methods, and light.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7141 Digital Design Graphics
DIG DES GRAPH

Digital Design Graphics will help students to understand and create the most common types of computer graphics used in visual communications. Skills are developed through work with professional vector-based and page layout software used in the industry. Additionally, students will be introduced to a full range of image input technology and manipulation including conventional photography, digital imaging, and computer scanners. Students will learn to communicate concepts and ideas through various imaging devices.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Digital Design
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
5550 Graphic Design and Layout
GRAPH DES LT

Graphic Design and Layout teaches design process and the proper and creative use of type as a means to develop effective communications for global, corporate and social application. Students will create samples for a portfolio, which may include elements or comprehensive projects in logo, stationery, posters, newspaper, magazine, billboard, and interface design.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Digital Design; Digital Design Graphics
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Principles course is not required until 24-25 school year because this course is included in Perkins V pathways.
  • Schools wishing to offer this course for multiple credits should utilize Next Level Programs of Study
7138 Interactive Media Design
IN MED DES

Interactive Media Design focuses on the tools, strategies, and techniques for interactive design and emerging technologies, like web and social media. Students will learn the basics of planning, shooting, editing and post-producing video and sound. Additionally, students will explore the process of integrating text, graphics, audio and video for effective communication of information.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Digital Design; Digital Design Graphics
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7136 Professional Photography & Videography
PRO PHOTO/VID

Professional Photography & Videography further develops advanced camera skills and photographic vision. The course introduces special techniques and digital processes while refining printing and processing skills. It will also emphasize good composition and the use of photography as a communication tool. Students will also learn the basics of planning, shooting, editing and post- producing video and sound.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Digital Design; Digital Design Graphics
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7246 Digital Design Capstone
DIG DES CAP

The Digital Design Capstone course provides students the opportunity to dive deeper into advanced concepts of Visual Communication including user experience/user interface design, video production editing, animation and/or web design. Depending on the length of the course, students may focus their efforts on one area or explore multiple aspects.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Digital Design Concentrator Sequence
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semester required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits max
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway:  Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising (TAM)

Cluster: Arts, AV Tech and Communications
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A

Concentrator B  (2 hour block)

Capstone (2 hours)
TAM-Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising 7301 Principles of Fashion and Textiles 7302 Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising 7303 Advanced Textiles 7304 Fashion and Textiles Capstone
7301 Principles of Fashion and Textiles
PRIN FASH TEXT

Principles of Fashion and Textiles prepares students for occupations and higher education programs of study related to the entire spectrum of careers in the fashion industry. This course builds a foundation that prepares students for all aspects of the fashion creation process. Major topics include: Basic clothing construction techniques, pattern alterations, and use of commercial patterns.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
7302 Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising
TEXT APP MERCH

Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising provides a comprehensive overview of the textiles, apparel and merchandising industry specific to fashion related goods including the nature of fashion, raw materials and production, designers, retailers, and supporting services.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Fashion and Textiles
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
7303 Advanced Textiles
ADV TEXT

Advanced Textiles will focus on the study of textiles concerning fiber, yarn, fabric construction, and finishes which affect the selection, use, and care of textiles.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Fashion and Textiles; Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
7304 Fashion and Textiles Capstone
FASH TEXT CAP

Fashion Textile Capstone studies the evolution of Western dress from ancient times to the twentieth century. Emphasis on representative style and change over time. Additionally, this course will focus on the Identification of physical features which affect apparel quality. Analysis of ready-to-wear apparel to identify features which produce desirable aesthetic and functional performance is also covered.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Fashion and Textiles; Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising; Advanced Textiles
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway:  Radio and Television

Cluster: Arts, AV Tech and Communications
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Radio and Television 7139 Principles of Broadcasting 7306 Audio and Video Production Essentials 7307 Mass Media Production 7380 Radio& TV Broadcasting Capstone
7139 Principles of Broadcasting
PRIN BROAD

The purpose of the Principles of Broadcasting course is to provide entry-level fundamental skills for students who wish to seek or pursue opportunities in the field of broadcasting or mass media. Students will explore the technical aspects of audio and sound design for radio production and distribution, as well as, the technical aspects of video production and distribution.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7306 Audio and Video Production Essentials
AUD VID PROD

Audio and Video Production Essentials provides an in-depth study on audio and video production techniques for radio, television, and digital technologies. Students will learn skills necessary for audio production and on-air work used in radio and other digital formats. Additionally, experience will be gained in the development of the video production process; including skills in message development, directing, camera, video switcher, and character generator operations.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Broadcasting
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
7307 Mass Media Production
MASS MED PROD

Mass Media Production will focus on the study of theory and practice in the voice and visual aspects of radio and television performance. In addition, this course introduces the skills used to acquire and deliver news stories in a digital media format. Students will learn how to research issues and events, interview news sources, interact with law enforcement and government officials, along with learning to write in a comprehensive news style.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Broadcasting; Audio and Video Production Essentials
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
7308 Radio & TV Broadcasting Capstone
RAD TV BROAD CAP

This course will cover a variety of domains further building on skills in video production, and broadcast industry practices specific to radio, television, and digital media. Attention will be given to cross- industry synergies, emerging technologies, and the global market for media. Students are highly encouraged to do a video newscast or radio practicum to gain real world experience. In most cases this practicum may be completed through a school-based enterprise.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Broadcasting; Audio and Video Production Essentials; Mass Media Production
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster:  Business Management, Marketing, and Finance


Pathway:  Business Administration

Cluster: Business Management and Administration
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Business Administration 4562 Principles of Business Management 7143 Management Fundamentals 4524 Accounting Fundamentals 7256 Business Administration Capstone
4562 Principles of Business Management
PRIN BUS

Principles of Business Management examines business ownership, organization principles and problems, management, control facilities, administration, financial management, and development practices of business enterprises. This course will also emphasize the identification and practice of the appropriate use of technology to communicate and solve business problems and aid in decision making. Attention will be given to developing business communication, problem-solving, and decision-making skills using spreadsheets, word processing, data management, and presentation software.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Digital Applications and Responsibility
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7143 Management Fundamentals
MGMT FUND

Management Fundamentals describes the functions of managers, including the management of activities and personnel. Describes the judicial system and the nature and sources of law affecting business. Studies contracts, sales contracts with emphasis on Uniform Commercial Code Applications, remedies for breach of contract and tort liabilities. Examines legal aspects of property ownership, structures of business ownership, and agency relationships.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
4524 Accounting Fundamentals
INTO ACCT

Accounting Fundamentals introduces the language of business using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships and partnerships using double-entry accounting. Emphasis is placed on accounting principles as they relate to both manual and automated financial systems. This course involves understanding, analyzing, and recording business transactions and preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial reports as a basis for decision-making.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective all diplomas
  • Principles course is not required until 24-25 school year because this course is included in Perkins V pathways.
  • Formerly Introduction to Accounting
7256 Business Administration Capstone
BUS ADMIN CAP

The Business Administration Capstone course will allow students to explore advanced topics in business leadership including Human Resources and International Business. Additionally students will have the chance to complete Managerial Accounting. Throughout the course students will develop business communication skills through work on projects, labs, and simulations. All of these courses represent key business competencies required by nearly all postsecondary Business schools.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management; Management Fundamentals; Accounting Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway:  Accounting

Cluster: Business Management and Administration
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Accounting 4562 Principles of Business Management 4524 Accounting Fundamentals 4522 Advanced Accounting 7252 Accounting Capstone
4562 Principles of Business Management
PRIN BUS

Principles of Business Management examines business ownership, organization principles and problems, management, control facilities, administration, financial management, and development practices of business enterprises. This course will also emphasize the identification and practice of the appropriate use of technology to communicate and solve business problems and aid in decision making. Attention will be given to developing business communication, problem-solving, and decision-making skills using spreadsheets, word processing, data management, and presentation software.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Digital Applications and Responsibility
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
4524 Accounting Fundamentals
INTO ACCT

Accounting Fundamentals introduces the language of business using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships and partnerships using double-entry accounting. Emphasis is placed on accounting principles as they relate to both manual and automated financial systems. This course involves understanding, analyzing, and recording business transactions and preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial reports as a basis for decision-making.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective all diplomas
  • Principles course is not required until 24-25 school year because this course is included in Perkins V pathways.
  • Formerly Introduction to Accounting
4522 Advanced Accounting
ADV ACC

Advanced Accounting expands on the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for various forms of business ownership using double-entry accounting covered in Accounting Fundamentals, including an emphasis on payroll accounting. Topics covered include calculating gross pay, withholdings, net pay, direct deposits, journalizing payroll transactions and preparing individual earnings records and payroll registers. Emphasis is placed on applying Generally Accepted Accounting Principles through hands-on practice with popular commercial accounting software packages that are currently used in business.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management; Accounting Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course
7252 Accounting Capstone
ACCT CAP

The Accounting Capstone course will emphasize Managerial Accounting concepts and Income Tax Accounting for individuals and sole proprietorships. Topics include general versus cost accounting systems, cost behavior, cost-volume profit analysis, budgeting, standard cost systems, responsibility accounting, incremental analysis, and capital investment analysis. Offers an overview of federal and state income tax law for individuals including taxable income, capital gains and losses, adjustments, standard and itemized deductions, tax credits and appropriate tax forms. When offered for multiple credits per semester, the Accounting Capstone may be used to provide students the opportuntity to participate in an intensive work-based learning experience and/or to complete additional coursework in using spreadsheets to solve accounting cases and to complete a postsecondary credential from ITCC or VU.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management; Accounting Fundamentals; Advanced Accounting
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

Pathway:  Marketing and Sales

Cluster: Business Management and Administration
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Marketing and Sales 4562 Principles of Business Management 5914 Marketing Fundamentals 5918 Strategic Marketing 7201 Business Management Capstone
7145 Digital Marketing
4562 Principles of Business Management
PRIN BUS

Principles of Business Management examines business ownership, organization principles and problems, management, control facilities, administration, financial management, and development practices of business enterprises. This course will also emphasize the identification and practice of the appropriate use of technology to communicate and solve business problems and aid in decision making. Attention will be given to developing business communication, problem-solving, and decision-making skills using spreadsheets, word processing, data management, and presentation software.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Digital Applications and Responsibility
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
5914 Marketing Fundamentals
PRN MRKT

Marketing Fundamentals provides a basic introduction to the scope and importance of marketing in the global economy. Course topics include the seven functions of marketing: promotion, channel management, pricing, product/service management, market planning, marketing information management, and professional selling skills. Emphasis is marketing content but will involve use of oral and written communications, mathematical applications, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills through the development of an integrated marketing plan and other projects.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11,12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management*
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • *Formerly Principles of Marketing; Principles course is not required until 2024-25 school year because this course is included in Perkins V pathways.
7145 Digital Marketing
DGTL MARK

Digital Marketing provides an introduction to the world of e-commerce and digital marketing media. The course covers how to integrate digital media and e-commerce into organizational and marketing strategy. Students will explore e-commerce applications and the most popular digital marketing tactics and tools. Emphasizes familiarity with executing digital media, understanding the marketing objectives that digital media can help organizations achieve, and establishing and enhancing an organization’s digital marketing presence.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management; Marketing Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
5918 Strategic Marketing
STRT MRKT

Strategic Marketing builds upon the foundations of marketing and applies the functions of marketing at an advanced level. Students will study the basic principles of consumer behavior and examine the application of theories from psychology, social psychology, and economics. The relationship between consumer behavior and marketing activities will be reviewed.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management*; Marketing Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-2 credits per semester, 4 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • *Principles course is not required until 2024-25 school year because this course is included in Perkins V pathways.
7201 Business Management Capstone
BUS MGMT CAP

The Business Management Capstone is designed to provide any student with the Business Management skills necessary to run their own business or to serve in upper level management. Students will explore Management Theory, Accounting, and Business Law. The Business Management Capstone can be used with any career pathway except Business Administration. Completion of the course may allow students the opportunity to earn a CT or TC through ITCC.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Any CTE Business Concentrator Sequence except Business Administration
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
  • Recommended Capstone course for Entrepreneurship, Insurance, and Marketing Programs of Study

Pathway:  Entrepreneurship

Cluster: Business Management and Administration
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Entrepreneurship 7154 Principles of Entrepreneurship 7148 New Venture Development 7147 Small Business Operations 7201 Business Management Capstone
7154 Principles of Entrepreneurship
PRIN ENTR

Principles of Entrepreneurship focuses on students learning about their own strengths, character and skills and how their unique abilities can apply to entrepreneurship, as well as how an entrepreneurial mindset can serve them regardless of their career path. Students will learn about the local, regional and state resources and will begin to understand and apply the entrepreneurial process. The course helps students to identify and evaluate business ideas while learning the steps and competencies required to launch a successful new venture. The course helps students apply what they have learned from the content when they write a Personal Vision Statement, a Business Concept Statement, and an Elevator Pitch.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7148 New Venture Development
ENT MAR MAN

New Venture Development is targeted to students interested in creating and growing their own businesses. The course will focus on key marketing strategies particularly relevant for new ventures. Students will apply marketing concepts to entrepreneurial company challenges, which include creating and nurturing relationships with new customers, suppliers, distributors, employees and investors; and understand the special challenges and opportunities involved in developing marketing strategies “from the ground up.”

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Entrepreneurship
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7147 Small Business Operation
ENT FIN MAN

Small Business Operations will help students identify and evaluate the various sources available for funding a new enterprise; demonstrate an understanding of financial terminology; read, prepare, and analyze basic financial statements; estimating capital requirements and risk, exit strategies; and prepare a budget for their business, including taxes and personnel costs. In addition, the student should be able to explain the importance of working capital and cash management. The student should also be able to identify financing needs, and prepare sales forecasts.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Entrepreneurship; New Venture Development
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7201 Business Management Capstone
BUS MGMT CAP

The Business Management Capstone is designed to provide any student with the Business Management skills necessary to run their own business or to serve in upper level management. Students will explore Management Theory, Accounting, and Business Law. The Business Management Capstone can be used with any career pathway except Business Administration. Completion of the course may allow students the opportunity to earn a CT or TC through ITCC.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Any CTE Business Concentrator Sequence except Business Administration
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
  • Recommended Capstone course for Entrepreneurship, Insurance, and Marketing Programs of Study

Pathway: Business Operations and Technology

Cluster: Business Management and Administration
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Business Operations and Technology 7153 Principles of Business Operations and Technology 7144 Business Office Communications 7146 Digital Data Applications 7254 Business Operations and Technology Capstone
7153 Principles of Business Operations and Technology
PRIN BUS OP TECH

The Principles of Business Operations and Technology course will prepare students to plan, organize, direct, and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization and be successful in a work environment. Students are provided opportunities to develop attitudes and apply skills and knowledge in the areas of business, management, Microsoft office, and finance. Individual experiences will be based upon the student’s career and educational goals.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7144 Business Office Communications
BUS OFF COMM

The Business Office Communications course emphasizes the analysis of communication to direct the choice of oral and written methods and techniques. It includes practice in writing a variety of messages used to communicate in business and industry with an emphasis on the potential impact of the message on the receiver as a basis for planning and delivering effective business communications. Through projects and the development of messages students will develop their knowledge and skills for the use of Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Operations and Technology
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7146 Digital Data Applications
DGTL REC KEEP

Students will use Microsoft Excel to sort and search records, combine files, produce reports, and to extract data from a file. This course is designed to include creating and formatting worksheets, using formulas and basic functions, creating charts, and printing professional-looking reports. Additionally students will use Microsoft Access to create a database and to manage a database through the creation and modification of a query. Students will also be expected to produce reports from the information.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Operations and Technology
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7254 Business Operations and Technology Capstone
BUS OPER CAP

Digital literacy has become increasingly important to the business environment. Technological advances provide opportunities for businesses to survey inclusion of new innovations. This course discusses, identifies, researches, and applies emerging technologies. Discussing new technology and understanding the importance of updating skills is necessary for today’s business operations.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Business Operations and Technology; Business Office Communications; Digital Data Applications
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster: Education and Training


Pathway:  Early Childhood Education

Cluster: Education and Training
Pathway

Principles

Concentrator A  (2 hour block)

Concentrator B

Capstone (3 hour block)

Early Childhood Education 7160 Principles of Early Childhood Education 7158 Early Childhood Education Curriculum 7159 Early Childhood Education Guidance 7259 Early Childhood Education Capstone
7160 Principles of Early Childhood Education
PRIN EAR CH ED

This course provides students with an overview of skills and strategies necessary to successfully complete a certificate. Additionally, it provides an overview of the history, theory, and foundations of early childhood education as well as exposure to types of programs, curricula and services available to young children. This course also examines basic principles of child development, Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP), importance of family, licensing, and elements of quality care of young children with an emphasis on the learning environment related to health, safety, and nutrition. Students may be required to complete observations and field experiences with children as related to this course.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7158 Early Childhood Education Curriculum
EAR CHD ED CUR

Early Childhood Education Curriculum examines developmentally appropriate environments and activities in various childcare settings while exploring the varying developmental levels and cultural backgrounds of children. Students may be required to complete observations and field experiences with children as related to this course.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Early Childhood Education
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diploma
7159 Early Childhood Education Guidance
EAR CHD ED GD

This course allows students to analyze developmentally appropriate guidance, theory and implementation for various early care and education settings. It also provides a basic understanding of the anti-bias/multicultural emphasis in the field of early childhood. Students may be required to complete observations and field experiences with children as related to this course.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Early Childhood Education
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diploma
7259 Early Childhood Education Capstone
ERLY CHILD CAP

This course will prepare students to complete the application, CDA exam, and verification process for the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. Students may also study the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and moral development of children from conception to age twelve. Theories of child development, biological and environmental foundations, prenatal development, the birth process, and the newborn baby will be discussed. Additionally, students will explore the aspects of early literacy skill development in young children from birth through third grade. Students will explore techniques, technological tools and other learning opportunities that encourage positive attitudes in children regarding listening, speaking, reading and writing activities. In the course, students will research, examine and explore the use of observation in screening and assessment to promote healthy literacy development in early childhood education. Finally, students will be provided an introduction to caring for each exceptional child. This includes theories and practices for producing optimal developmental growth. Students may be required to complete observations and field experiences with children as related to this course.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Early Childhood Education; Early Childhood Curriculum; Early Childhood Guidance
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diploma

Pathway:  Education Professions

Cluster: Education and Training
Pathway

Principles

Concentrator A  (2 hour block for observations)

Concentrator B (1 hour)

Capstone (3 hours)

Remote Site

Education Professions 7161 Principles of Teaching 7157 Child and Adolescent Development 7162 Teaching and Learning 7267 Education Professions Capstone
Students must earn all prior dual college credit to qualify for the capstone.  The capstone will take place on the ISU campus.  Students will declare elementary or secondary education for second semester of the capstone.
7161 Principles of Teaching
PRIN TEACH

This course provides a general introduction to the field of teaching. Students will explore educational careers, teaching preparation, and professional expectations as well as requirements for teacher certification. Current trends and issues in education will be examined. A minimum 20 hour classroom observation experience is required for successful completion of this course.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7157 Child and Adolescent Development
CHLD ADL DEV

Child and Adolescent Development examines the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and moral development of the child from birth through adolescence with a focus on the middle years through adolescence. Basic theories of child development, biological and environmental foundations of development, and the study of children through observation and interviewing techniques are explored. The influence of parents, peers, the school environment, culture and the media are discussed. An observation experience up to 20 hours may be required for completion of this course. This course has been approved to be offered for dual credit. Students pursuing this course for dual credit are still required to meet the minimum prerequisites for the course and pass the course with a C or better in order for dual credit to be awarded.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Teaching
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diploma
7162 Teaching and Learning
TEACH LRN

Teaching and Learning provides students the opportunity to apply many of the concepts that they have learned throughout the Education Professions pathway. In addition to a focus on best practices, this course will provide an introduction to the role that technology plays in the modern classroom. Through hands-on experience with educational software, utility packages, and commonly used microcomputer hardware, students will analyze ways to integrate technology as a tool for instruction, evaluation, and management.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Teaching;
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7267 Education Professions Capstone
ED PROF CAP

The Education Professions Capstone provides an extended opportunity for field experience to further apply concepts that have been presented throughout the pathway. Students will also have the opportunity to explore the topics of the exceptional child and literacy development through children’s literature. Students will gain a deeper understanding of inclusive teaching techniques along with policies, theories, and laws related to special education. Students interested in pursuing a career in Elementary Education are encouraged to also study the benefits of using children’s literature in the classroom. This course may be further developed to include specific content for students interested in pursuing a career in secondary education. The course should include a significant classroom observation and assisting experience.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Teaching; Child and Adolescent Development, Teaching and Learning
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diploma

Career Cluster: Health Sciences


Pathway:  Certified Nursing Aid (CNA) Pre-Nursing

Cluster: Health Sciences
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour)

Concentrator B

Capstone  (3 hour block) Remote site

Certified Nursing Aid (CNA) Pre-Nursing 7168 Principles of Healthcare 5274 Medical Terminology 7166 Healthcare Specialist: CNA 7255 Healthcare Specialist Capstone
Students work capstone classroom/lab is in a hospital and all rules that hospitals must follow must be followed by participants.  Students will work with patients at various facilities including long term care facilities.
7168 Principles of Healthcare
PRIN HLCR

Principles of Healthcare content includes skills common to specific health career topics such as patient nursing care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory, public health, and an introduction to healthcare systems. Lab experiences are organized and planned around the activities associated with the student’s career objectives.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
5274 Medical Terminology
MED TERMS

Medical Terminology prepares students with language skills necessary for effective, independent use of health and medical reference materials. It includes the study of health and medical abbreviations, symbols, and Greek and Latin word part meanings, all taught within the context of body systems. This course builds skills in pronouncing, spelling, and defining new words encountered in verbal and written information in the healthcare industry. Students have the opportunity to acquire essential skills for accurate and logical communication, and interpretation of medical records. Emphasis is on forming a foundation of a medical vocabulary including; appropriate and accurate meaning, spelling, and pronunciation of medical terms, and abbreviations, signs, and symbols.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, maximum of 2 credits
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7166 Healthcare Specialist: CNA
HC SPEC CNA

The Healthcare Specialist: CNA prepares individuals desiring to work as nursing assistants with the knowledge, skills and attitudes essential for providing basic care in extended care facilities, hospitals and home health agencies under the direction of licensed nurses. The course will introduce students to the disease process and aspects of caring for a long-term care resident with dementia. Individuals who successfully complete this course are eligible to apply to sit for the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) certification exam for nursing assistants. This course meets the minimum standards set forth by the ISDH for Certified Nursing Assistant training and for health care workers in long-term care facilities.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Healthcare
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7255 Healthcare Specialist Capstone
HC SPEC CAP

The capstone course will provide Healthcare students acquire additional knowledge and skills necessary to work in a variety of health care settings beyond a long term care facility, including hospitals, doctor’s offices and clinics. Students can accomplish this goal by completing coursework that will cover topics such as Medical Law and Ethics, Electronic Health Records, and/or Behavioral Health. Schools may offer additional healthcare certifications such as the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant or Phlebotomy along with the coursework or in place of the coursework.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Healthcare; Medical Terminology; Healthcare Specialist: CNA, EMT or Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA)
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semester required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits max
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway:  Certified Clinical Medical Assistant

Cluster: Health Sciences
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour)

Concentrator B

Capstone  (3 hour block) Remote site

Certified Clinical Medical Assistant 7168 Principles of Healthcare 5274 Medical Terminology 7164 Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) 7255 Healthcare Specialist Capstone
7168 Principles of Healthcare
PRIN HLCR

Principles of Healthcare content includes skills common to specific health career topics such as patient nursing care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory, public health, and an introduction to healthcare systems. Lab experiences are organized and planned around the activities associated with the student’s career objectives.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
5274 Medical Terminology
MED TERMS

Medical Terminology prepares students with language skills necessary for effective, independent use of health and medical reference materials. It includes the study of health and medical abbreviations, symbols, and Greek and Latin word part meanings, all taught within the context of body systems. This course builds skills in pronouncing, spelling, and defining new words encountered in verbal and written information in the healthcare industry. Students have the opportunity to acquire essential skills for accurate and logical communication, and interpretation of medical records. Emphasis is on forming a foundation of a medical vocabulary including; appropriate and accurate meaning, spelling, and pronunciation of medical terms, and abbreviations, signs, and symbols.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, maximum of 2 credits
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7164 Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA)
CERT CL MED AST

The Certified Clinical Medical Assistant course will prepare students for the National Healthcare Association CCMA exam. Instruction includes taking and recording vital signs, preparing patients for examination, patient education, and assisting the physician during the exam. The collecting and preparation of laboratory specimen and basic laboratory test will be covered. Prepares for the administration of medication, venipuncture, ECG, and wound care. Provides a basic understanding of the clinical and administrative duties and responsibilities pertinent to medical offices. Includes instruction in medical correspondence and records, case histories of patients, filing, telephone procedures, appointment scheduling, receptionist duties, and processing mail. Written, verbal and nonverbal communications according to patient needs are covered as well as documentation and associated legal and ethical boundaries.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Healthcare; Medical Terminology
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Schools are strongly encouraged to offer the CCMA course along with Principles of Healthcare and Medical Terminology as part of a 3 period block of
7255 Healthcare Specialist Capstone
HC SPEC CAP

The capstone course will provide Healthcare students acquire additional knowledge and skills necessary to work in a variety of health care settings beyond a long term care facility, including hospitals, doctor’s offices and clinics. Students can accomplish this goal by completing coursework that will cover topics such as Medical Law and Ethics, Electronic Health Records, and/or Behavioral Health. Schools may offer additional healthcare certifications such as the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant or Phlebotomy along with the coursework or in place of the coursework.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Healthcare; Medical Terminology; Healthcare Specialist: CNA, EMT or Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA)
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semester required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits max
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway:  Emergency Medical Technician

Cluster: Health Sciences
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour)

Concentrator B

Capstone (3 hour block) Remote site evening class

Emergency Medical Technician 7168 Principles of Healthcare 5274 Medical Terminology 7165 Emergency Medical Tech 7255 Healthcare Specialist Capstone
Classes meet on Tuesday and Thursday evenings.  Certification includes required ambulance shifts.
7168 Principles of Healthcare
PRIN HLCR

Principles of Healthcare content includes skills common to specific health career topics such as patient nursing care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory, public health, and an introduction to healthcare systems. Lab experiences are organized and planned around the activities associated with the student’s career objectives.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
5274 Medical Terminology
MED TERMS

Medical Terminology prepares students with language skills necessary for effective, independent use of health and medical reference materials. It includes the study of health and medical abbreviations, symbols, and Greek and Latin word part meanings, all taught within the context of body systems. This course builds skills in pronouncing, spelling, and defining new words encountered in verbal and written information in the healthcare industry. Students have the opportunity to acquire essential skills for accurate and logical communication, and interpretation of medical records. Emphasis is on forming a foundation of a medical vocabulary including; appropriate and accurate meaning, spelling, and pronunciation of medical terms, and abbreviations, signs, and symbols.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, maximum of 2 credits
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7165 Emergency Medical Tech
EMT

This course is based on the training program developed by the Department of Transportation and the Emergency Medical Services Commission of Indiana. It covers theories, techniques and operational aspects of pre-hospital emergency care within the scope and responsibility of the emergency medical technician (EMT). It requires laboratory practice and clinical observation in a hospital emergency room and ambulance. Successful completion of the course meets national requirements to test for certification as an NREMT.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Healthcare; and Medical Terminology
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Schools are strongly encouraged to offer the EMT course along with Principles of Healthcare and Medical Terminology as part of a 3 period block of
7255 Healthcare Specialist Capstone
HC SPEC CAP

The capstone course will provide Healthcare students acquire additional knowledge and skills necessary to work in a variety of health care settings beyond a long term care facility, including hospitals, doctor’s offices and clinics. Students can accomplish this goal by completing coursework that will cover topics such as Medical Law and Ethics, Electronic Health Records, and/or Behavioral Health. Schools may offer additional healthcare certifications such as the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant or Phlebotomy along with the coursework or in place of the coursework.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Healthcare; Medical Terminology; Healthcare Specialist: CNA, EMT or Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA)
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semester required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits max
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster: Hospitality


Pathway:  Culinary Arts – Baking and Pastry

Cluster: Hospitality and Tourism
Pathway

Principles

Concentrator A (2 hour block)

Concentrator B

Capstone  (2 hour block)

Culinary Arts – Baking and Pastry 7173 Principles of Culinary and Hospitality 7171 Nutrition 7169 Culinary Arts 7235 Baking and Pastry Capstone
7173 Principles of Culinary and Hospitality
PRIN HOSP

Principles of Culinary and Hospitality is designed to develop an understanding of the hospitality industry and career opportunities, and responsibilities in the food service and lodging industry. Introduces procedures for decision making which affects operation management, products, labor, and revenue.

Additionally, students will learn the fundamentals of food preparation, basic principles of sanitation, service procedures, and safety practices in the food service industry including proper operation techniques for equipment.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7171 Nutrition
FD THRY NUT

Nutrition students will learn the characteristics, functions and food sources of the major nutrient groups and how to maximize nutrient retention in food preparation and storage. Students will be made aware of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle and to apply those principles to menu planning and food preparation. This course will engage students in hands-on learning of nutritional concepts such as preparing nutrient dense meals or examining nutritional needs of student athletes

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Culinary and Hospitality
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7169 Culinary Arts
CUL ARTS
Culinary Arts teaches students how to prepare the four major stocks, the five mother sauces (in addition to smaller sauces) and various soups. Additional emphasis is placed on the further development of the classical cooking methods. This course will also present the fundamentals of baking science including terminology, ingredients, weights and measures, and proper use and care of equipment. Students will produce yeast goods, pies, cakes, cookies, and quick breads.
  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Culinary and Hospitality
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7235 Baking and Pastry Capstone
BAKE PSTRY CAP
The objective of this course is to help students understand the science of baking and the different reactions that take place based on the ingredients, temperatures, and equipment in relation to the final product. The course requires students to produce and finish a variety of cakes. The course emphasizes application techniques, color coordination, and the flavor and texture of fillings. Students will practice the techniques of basic cake decorating. This course will also address classical French and European desserts, including the preparation of goods such as Napoleons, Gateau St. Honoré, petit fours and petit fours sec, ganaches, pastry creams and fillings, sauces, flans and tarts, and European sponges. The course also includes instruction in tempering of chocolates, molding, and chocolate plastique, preparation of truffles, pastillage and marzipan, short doughs, and meringues. The student will be instructed in the latest preparation methods, innovative ideas for impressive plate presentations, and techniques that utilize specialized equipment and tools to make high-tech, novel creations
  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Culinary and Hospitality; Nutrition; Culinary Arts
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semester required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits max
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster:  Human and Social Services


Pathway:  Human Services
Cluster: Human Services
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Human Services 7176 Principles of Human Services 7174 Understanding Diversity 7177 Relationships and Emotions 7241 Human Services Capstone
Special Note: There are no dual college credits or industry credentials available in this pathway.
7176 Principles of Human Services
PRIN HUM SERV

Principles of Human Services explores the history of human services, career opportunities, and the role of the human service worker. Focuses on target populations and community agencies designed to meet the needs of various populations. The course includes a required job shadowing project in a Human Services setting (a suggested four-hour minimum to meet Ivy Tech requirements). This course will also encourage cultural awareness and appreciation of diversity. Focuses on cultural variations in attitudes, values, language, gestures, and customs. Includes information about major racial and ethnic groups in the United States.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7174 Understanding Diversity
DIS SERV

Understanding Diversity encourages cultural awareness and appreciation of diversity. Focuses on cultural variations in attitudes, values, language, gestures, and customs. Includes information about major racial and ethnic groups in the United States.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Human Services
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7177 Relationships and Emotions
REL EMO

Relationship & Emotions examines the key elements of healthy relationships. Explores the main problems that damage relationships. Presents research findings on successful and unsuccessful relationships, and emotional connections. Explores the impact of one’s emotional and relationship history on current and future romantic relationships. Presents practical, scientific-based skills for improving relationships. Additionally, this course offers practical and useful information for people who have experienced loss. Students have the opportunity to evaluate their own experiences and attitudes toward loss and grief.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Human Services
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7241 Human Services Capstone
HUM SRV CAP

This course provides opportunities to increase effectiveness in helping people. Examines the helping process in terms of skills, helping stages, and issues involved in a helping relationship. This course also introduces and develops basic interviewing skills. Includes assessment strategies and treatment planning. This course provides basic information about the problems of alcohol and other drug abuse. Explores symptoms and effects of abuse and dependence on individuals, families, and society Additionally, this course studies group dynamics, issues and behavior. Includes group functioning and leadership, guidelines on working effectively with a co-leader, and practical ways of evaluating the group processes. It provides an overview of legal and ethical aspects in the field of human services with implications for the human service worker. Includes topics such as confidentiality, rights of clients, client records, equal protection for staff and clients, and discrimination. The Human Service Ethical Code and related codes are covered with an overview of ethical dimensions of practice.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Relationships & Emotions; Understanding Diversity
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semester required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits max
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster:  Information Technology


Pathway:  Information Technology Operations

Cluster: Information Tech
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Information Technology Operations 7183 Principles of Computing 7180 Information Technology Fundamentals 7181 Networking and Cybersecurity Operations 7245 IT Operations: IT Support Capstone
7183 Principles of Computing
PRIN COMP INFO

Principles of Computing provides students the opportunity to explore how computers can be used in a wide variety of settings. The course will begin by exploring trends of computing and the necessary skills to implement information systems. Topics include operating systems, database technology, cybersecurity, cloud implementations and other concepts associated with applying the principles of good information management to the organization. Students will also have the opportunity to utilize basic programming skills to develop scripts designed to solve problems. Students will learn about algorithms, logic development and flowcharting.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Computer Science; Completed or Co-Enrolled in Algebra I
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7180 Information Technology Fundamentals
INFO TECH FUN

Information Technology Fundamentals provides the necessary competencies required for an entry-level Information Technology professional. Students will have the knowledge required to assemble components based on customer requirements, install, configure and maintain devices/software for end users, understand the basics of networking and security, properly and safely diagnose, resolve and document common hardware and software issues while applying troubleshooting skills. Students will also learn appropriate customer support, understand the basics of virtualization, desktop imaging, and deployment. This course should also prepare students for the CompTia A+ Certification Exam.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Computing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7181 Networking and Cybersecurity Operations
INFO TEC SUP SER

Advanced Information Technology will provide students with the fundamental concepts in networking and cybersecurity. Students are introduced to the principles and concepts of computer networking, covering the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network.

Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. Students will be able to troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues. The students will also explore the field of Cyber Security/Information Assurance focusing on the technical and managerial aspects of the discipline. Students will be introduced to the basic terminology, concepts, and best practices of computer/network security and the roles and responsibilities of management/security personnel. The students will learn the technologies used and techniques involved in creating a secure computer networking environment including authentication and the types of attacks against an organization.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Computing; Information Technology Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7245 IT Operations: IT Support Capstone
IT SUPP CAP

IT Support Capstone students will acquire the skills and knowledge needed to provide tier 1 technical support services. The student will learn troubleshooting and problem solving in working with end users using various digital tools such as helpdesk software, knowledge bases, ticket management systems, and other tier 1 computer related support services. Students will also learn to implement, administer, and troubleshoot Information systems using the Microsoft Windows clients and servers in an enterprise environment. Students will be introduced to managing applications, files, folders, and devices in a Windows active directory environment. Additionally students have the chance to understand and apply Linux and Virtualization concepts.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Computing; Information Technology Fundamentals; Networking and Cybersecurity Operations
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway:  Software Development

Cluster: Information Tech
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Software Development 7183 Principles of Computing 7185 Website and Database Development 7184 Software Development 7253 Software Development Capstone
7183 Principles of Computing
PRIN COMP INFO

Principles of Computing provides students the opportunity to explore how computers can be used in a wide variety of settings. The course will begin by exploring trends of computing and the necessary skills to implement information systems. Topics include operating systems, database technology, cybersecurity, cloud implementations and other concepts associated with applying the principles of good information management to the organization. Students will also have the opportunity to utilize basic programming skills to develop scripts designed to solve problems. Students will learn about algorithms, logic development and flowcharting.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Computer Science; Completed or Co-Enrolled in Algebra I
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7185 Website and Database Development
WEB DATA DEV

Website and Database Development will provide students a basic understanding of the essential Web and Database skills and business practices that directly relate to Internet technologies used in Web site and Database design and development. Students will learn to develop Web sites using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Additionally students will be introduced to the basic concepts of databases including types of databases, general database environments, database design, normalization and development of tables, queries, reports, and applications. Students will be familiarized with the use of ANSI Standard Structured Query Language. Students will be introduced to data concepts such as data warehousing, data mining, and BIG Data. Students will develop a business application using database software such as Microsoft Access.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Computing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7184 Software Development
SOFT DEV

Software Development introduces students to concepts and practices of programming languages and software development. Students are introduced to algorithms and development tools used to document/implement computer logic. Discusses the history of software development, the different types of programming such as real time processing, web/database applications, and different program development environments. Concepts will be applied using different programming languages, and students will develop and test working programs in an integrated system.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Computing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7253 Software Development Capstone
SW DEV CAP

Software Development Capstone provides a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts involved when using an object oriented programming language. The emphasis is on logical program design using a modular approach involving task-oriented program functions. Object-oriented concepts such as methods, attributes, inheritance, exception handling, and polymorphism are utilized. Applications are developed using these concepts and include developing a graphical user interface, selecting forms and controls, assigning properties and writing code. Students will also build upon their web design experiences in previous courses by taking an in-depth look into client- and server-side scripting aspects including Java Script and PHP: hypertext preprocessor along with other scripting tools.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Computing; Website and Database Development; Software Development
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster:  Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)


Pathway:  Engineering

Cluster: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Engineering 4802 Introduction to Engineering Design 5644 Principles of Engineering 5538 Digital Electronics 5698 Engineering Design and Development
5650 Civil Engineering and Architecture
5534 Computer Integrated Manufacturing
4802 Introduction to Engineering Design
INT ENG DES

Introduction to Engineering Design is a fundamental pre-engineering course where students become familiar with the engineering design process. Students work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using industry standard sketches and current 3D design and modeling software to represent and communicate solutions. Students apply their knowledge through hands-on projects and document their work with the use of an engineering notebook. Students begin with completing structured activities and move to solving open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills. Ethical issues related to professional practice and product development are also presented. NOTE: This course aligns with the PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design curriculum. Use of the PLTW curriculum may require additional training and membership in the PLTW network.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • NOTE: Schools that have agreed to be part of the Project Lead the Way network must follow all training and data collection
5644 Principles of Engineering
PRNC ENG

Principles of Engineering is a course that focuses on the process of applying engineering, technological, scientific and mathematical principles in the design, production, and operation of products, structures, and systems. This is a hands-on course designed to provide students interested in engineering careers to explore experiences related to specialized fields such as civil, mechanical, and materials engineering.

Students will engage in research, development, planning, design, production, and project management to simulate a career in engineering. The topics of ethics and the impacts of engineering decisions are also addressed. Classroom activities are organized to allow students to work in teams and use modern technological processes, computers, CAD software, and production systems in developing and presenting solutions to engineering problems. Schools may use the PLTW curriculum to meet the standards for this course. NOTE: This course aligns with the PLTW Principles of Engineering curriculum. Use of the PLTW curriculum may require additional training and membership in the PLTW network.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Fulfills a science course requirement for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course
5650 Civil Engineering and Architecture
CIVIL ENG

Civil Engineering and Architecture introduces students to the fundamental design and development aspects of civil engineering and architectural planning activities. Application and design principles will be used in conjunction with mathematical and scientific knowledge. Computer software programs should allow students opportunities to design, simulate, and evaluate the construction of buildings and communities. During the planning and design phases, instructional emphasis should be placed on related transportation, water resource, and environmental issues. Activities should include the preparation of cost estimates as well as a review of regulatory procedures that would affect the project design. NOTE: This course aligns with the PLTW Civil Engineering and Architecture curriculum. Use of the PLTW Curriculum may require additional training and membership in the PLTW network.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course
5534 Computer Integrated Manufacturing
COMP INT MFG

Computer Integrated Manufacturing is a course that applies principles of rapid prototyping, robotics, and automation. This course builds upon the computer solid modeling skills developed in Introduction of Engineering Design. Students will use computer controlled rapid prototyping and CNC equipment to solve problems by constructing actual models of their three-dimensional designs. Students will also be introduced to the fundamentals of robotics and how this equipment is used in an automated manufacturing environment. Students will evaluate their design solutions using various techniques of analysis and make appropriate modifications before producing their prototypes. NOTE: This course aligns with the PLTW Computer Integrated Manufacturing curriculum. Use of the PLTW curriculum may require additional training and membership in the PLTW network.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course
5538 Digital Electronics
DIG ELEC

Digital Electronics is a course of study in applied digital logic that encompasses the design and application of electronic circuits and devices found in video games, watches, calculators, digital cameras, and thousands of other devices. Instruction includes the application of engineering and scientific principles as well as the use of Boolean algebra to solve design problems. Using computer software that reflects current industry standards, activities should provide opportunities for students to design, construct, test, and analyze simple and complex digital circuitry software will be used to develop and evaluate the product design. This course engages students in critical thinking and problem-solving skills, time management and teamwork skills.

NOTE: This course aligns with the PLTW Digital Electronics curriculum. Use of the PLTW curriculum may require additional training and membership in the PLTW network.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design (-or- Principles of Engineering Technology)
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Electronic Fundamentals
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course
5698 Engineering Design and Development
ENG DES DEV

Engineering Design and Development is an engineering research course in which students work in teams to research, design, test, and construct a solution to an open-ended engineering problem. The product development life cycle and a design process are used to guide the team to reach a solution to the problem. The team and/or individual(s)communicates their solution to a panel of stakeholders at the conclusion of the course. As the capstone course in the Engineering Pathway, EDD engages students in critical thinking, problem-solving, time management, and teamwork skills. NOTE: This course aligns with the PLTW Engineering Design and Development curriculum. Use of the PLTW curriculum may require additional training and membership in the PLTW network.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design; Principles of Engineering; and one pre-engineering specialty course
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

Pathway:  Design Technology

Cluster: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Design Technology 4802 Introduction to Engineering Design 7196 Mechanical and Architectural Design 7202 Manufacturing Principles and Design 7225 Architectural Design Capstone
7197 BIM Architecture 7223 Mechanical Design Capstone
4802 Introduction to Engineering Design
INT ENG DES

Introduction to Engineering Design is a fundamental pre-engineering course where students become familiar with the engineering design process. Students work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using industry standard sketches and current 3D design and modeling software to represent and communicate solutions. Students apply their knowledge through hands-on projects and document their work with the use of an engineering notebook. Students begin with completing structured activities and move to solving open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills. Ethical issues related to professional practice and product development are also presented. NOTE: This course aligns with the PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design curriculum. Use of the PLTW curriculum may require additional training and membership in the PLTW network.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • NOTE: Schools that have agreed to be part of the Project Lead the Way network must follow all training and data collection
7196 Mechanical and Architectural Design
ARCT DES

Mechanical and Architectural Design provides students with a basic understanding of creating working drawings related to manufacturing detailing and assembly as well as a survey of Architectural design focused on the creative design of buildings. Topics include fastening devices, thread symbols and nomenclature, surface texture symbols, classes of fits, and the use of parts lists, title blocks and revision blocks. From an Architecture perspective, this course covers problems of site analysis, facilities programming, space planning, conceptual design, proper use of materials, and selection of structure and construction techniques.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7202 Manufacturing Principles and Design
PRIN DES TECH

Manufacturing Principles and Design will challenge students will use 2D and 3D CAD skills to explore topics related to manufacturing principles and design. Students will gain an understanding of solid modeling and parametric solid modeling and use 3D printers to create industry part prints. Additionally, students will compare manufacturing practices like Lean Manufacturing, design and program CNC processes, and use metrology tools and practices to evaluate an object.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design; Mechanical and Architectural Design Fundamentals
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7197 BIM Architecture
COMP A DSGN

BIM Architecture will introduce students to Building Information Modeling (BIM) which is an intelligent 3D model-based process that gives architecture, engineering, and construction professionals the insight and tools to better plan, design, and construct buildings. Students will deepen their skills in 3D CAD and learn to use BIM software to capture and analyze concepts and to prepare client presentations for Commercial Construction.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7225 Architectural Design Capstone
ARCH DES CAP

Architectural Design Capstone covers residential design and drafting. Topics include interior space planning, structural design and development of working drawings. The course provides opportunity for students to design a residence using accepted building standards and introduces various construction materials. Students will also learn advanced CAD design topics in architectural design. Completion of the entire course may also provide students the opportunity to understand basic surveying equipment and surveying techniques.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design; Mechanical and Architectural Design Fundamentals; BIM Architecture
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas
7223 Mechanical Design Capstone
MECH DES CAP

Mechanical Design Capstone covers a broad range of design techniques that are critical for the Manufacturing industry. Students will have the chance to study solid modeling techniques and design, fundamental principles of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, Solidworks design software, and an introduction to additive manufacturing.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design; Mechanical and Architectural Design Fundamentals; Manufacturing Principles and Design
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway:  Computer Science

Cluster: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Computer Science 7183 Principles of Computing 7351 Topics in Computer Science 7352 Computer Science 7353 Computer Science Capstone
7183 Principles of Computing
PRIN COMP INFO

Principles of Computing provides students the opportunity to explore how computers can be used in a wide variety of settings. The course will begin by exploring trends of computing and the necessary skills to implement information systems. Topics include operating systems, database technology, cybersecurity, cloud implementations and other concepts associated with applying the principles of good information management to the organization. Students will also have the opportunity to utilize basic programming skills to develop scripts designed to solve problems. Students will learn about algorithms, logic development and flowcharting.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Computer Science; Completed or Co-Enrolled in Algebra I
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7351 Topics in Computer Science
TOP COMP SCI

Topics in Computer Science is designed for students to investigate emerging disciplines within the field of computer science. Students will use foundational knowledge from 7183 Principles of Computing to study the areas of data science, artificial intelligence, app/game development, and security. Students will utilize knowledge related to these areas and programming skills to develop solutions to authentic problems.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Computing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7352 Computer Science
COMP SCI

Computer Science introduces the fundamental concepts of procedural programming. Topics include data types, control structures, functions, arrays, files, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging. The course also offers an introduction to the historical and social context of computing and an overview of computer science as a discipline.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Computing
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • The AP Computer Science A curriculum may be used to complete the competencies required for this course.
7353 Computer Science Capstone
COMP SCI CAP

Computer Science Capstone provides a working understanding of the fundamentals of procedural and object-oriented program development using structured, modular concepts and modern object-oriented programming languages. Reviews control structures, functions, data types, variables, arrays, and data file access methods. The course is a second level computer science course introducing object oriented computer programming, using a language such as Java or C++. Object-oriented concepts studied include classes, objects, inheritance, polymorphism, operator overloading, exception handling, recursion, abstract data types, streams and file I/O. Students will explore programming concepts such as software reuse, data abstraction and event-driven programming.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Computing; Topics in Computer Science; Computer Science
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
Pathway:  Electronics and Computer Technology
Cluster: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
Pathway Principles (1 hour) Concentrator A (1 hour) Concentrator B (1 hour) Capstone (2 hours)
Electronics and Computer Technology 4802 Introduction to Engineering Design 7361 Electronic Fundamentals 5538 Digital Electronics 7362 Electronics and Computer Technology Capstone
4802 Introduction to Engineering Design
INT ENG DES

Introduction to Engineering Design is a fundamental pre-engineering course where students become familiar with the engineering design process. Students work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using industry standard sketches and current 3D design and modeling software to represent and communicate solutions. Students apply their knowledge through hands-on projects and document their work with the use of an engineering notebook. Students begin with completing structured activities and move to solving open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills. Ethical issues related to professional practice and product development are also presented. NOTE: This course aligns with the PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design curriculum. Use of the PLTW curriculum may require additional training and membership in the PLTW network.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • NOTE: Schools that have agreed to be part of the Project Lead the Way network must follow all training and data collection
7361 Electronic Fundamentals
ELEC FUND

Electronic Fundamentals will concentrate on the physical world of electricity and electronics. Practical techniques for proper and safe use of basic hand and machine tools are introduced. Techniques for connecting various types of circuits are also covered. The process of fabricating printed circuit boards is presented.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
5538 Digital Electronics
DIG ELEC

Digital Electronics is a course of study in applied digital logic that encompasses the design and application of electronic circuits and devices found in video games, watches, calculators, digital cameras, and thousands of other devices. Instruction includes the application of engineering and scientific principles as well as the use of Boolean algebra to solve design problems. Using computer software that reflects current industry standards, activities should provide opportunities for students to design, construct, test, and analyze simple and complex digital circuitry software will be used to develop and evaluate the product design. This course engages students in critical thinking and problem-solving skills, time management and teamwork skills.

NOTE: This course aligns with the PLTW Digital Electronics curriculum. Use of the PLTW curriculum may require additional training and membership in the PLTW network.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design (-or- Principles of Engineering Technology)
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Electronic Fundamentals
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course
7362 Electronics and Computer Technology Capstone
ECT CAP

Electronics and Computer Technology Capstone provides the opportunity for students to continue with foundational electronic concepts including circuit analysis and digital electronics modules. This course

incorporates classroom, laboratory, and work-based experiences in the fundamental electronics concepts of circuit analysis and digital electronics as well as optional modules focused on industrial technology, emerging electronic technologies, residential and commercial electronic communication, and automation. Industry certifications and additional post-secondary education are critical components of this pathway.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design; Electronic Fundamentals; Digital Electronics
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas

Career Cluster: Transportation


Pathway:  Automotive Service

Cluster: Transportation
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A

Concentrator B  (2 hour block)

Capstone (2 hours)
Automotive Services 7213 Principles of Automotive Services 7205 Brake Systems 7212 Steering and Suspensions 7375 Automotive Service Capstone
7213 Principles of Automotive Services
PRIN AUTO SER

This course gives students an overview of the operating and general maintenance systems of the modern automobile. Students will be introduced to the safety and operation of equipment and tools used in the automotive industry. Students will study the maintenance and light repair of automotive systems. Also, this course gives students an overview of the electrical operating systems of the modern automobile. Students will be introduced to the safety and operation of equipment and tools used in the electrical diagnosis and repair in the automotive electrical industry. Students will study the fundamentals of electricity and automotive electronics.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7205 Brake Systems
AUTO BRK ELE

This course gives students an in-depth study of vehicle electrical systems. Students will study the fundamentals of electricity and automotive electronics in various automotive systems. Additionally it teaches theory, service and repair of automotive braking systems. This course provides an overview of various mechanical brake systems used on today’s automobiles. This course will emphasize professional diagnosis and repair methods for brake systems.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Automotive Services
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Schools partnering with Vincennes University must offer the program of study as part of a 2-3 period
7212 Steering and Suspensions
ENG PERF

This course takes an in-depth look at engine performance, including concepts in the diagnosis and repair of ignition, fuel, emission and related computer networks. This course presents engine theory and operation and studies the various engine designs utilized today. This course also takes an in-depth look at engine performance, including advanced concepts in the diagnosis and repair of ignition, fuel, emission and related computer networks. This course presents engine theory and operation and studies the various engine designs utilized today. Hybrid/Alternative fuel technology will also be introduced.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Automotive Services
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
  • Schools partnering with Vincennes University must offer the program of study as part of a 2-3 period
7375 Automotive Service Capstone
AUTO SRV CAP

This course further explores important skills and competencies within the Automotive Service Technology Pathway. Topics such as Steering & Suspension, Engine Repair, Climate Control, and Driveline Service. Additionally, Co-Op and Internship opportunities will be available for students.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Automotive Services; Brake Systems; Steering and Suspensions
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semester required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits max
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

Pathway: Automotive Collision Repair

Cluster: Transportation
Pathway Principles (1 hour)

Concentrator A

Concentrator B  (2 hour block)

Capstone (2 hours)
Automotive Collision Repair 7215 Principles of Collision Repair 7204 Automotive Body Repair 7206 Plastic Body Repair and Paint Fundamentals 7380 Collision Repair Capstone
7215 Principles of Collision Repair
PRIN COL REP

Principles of Collision Repair provides students an overview of the operating, electrical, and general maintenance systems of the modern automobile. Students will be introduced to the safety and operation of equipment and tools used in the automotive collision industry. Students will study the basics of collision repair, along with learning to perform basic service and maintenance, including the car’s starting and charging system.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7204 Automotive Body Repair
AUTO BDY REP

Automotive Body Repair provides students with an understanding of the materials, measuring, welding, and information resources applicable to collision repair. Students will study steel and aluminum dent repair, including the welding practices commonly performed within an automotive repair environment. Students will gain basic skills and knowledge in oxy-fuel welding, cutting, brazing and plasma cutting, gas metal arc welding, squeeze type resistance welding, exterior panel welding and I-CAR welding test preparation. Students will also learn the installation of moldings, ornaments, and fasteners with emphasis on sheet metal analysis and safety.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Collision Repair
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7206 Plastic Body Repair and Paint Fundamentals
AUTO PT WELD

Plastic Body Repair and Paint Fundamentals introduces the types of fiberglass and plastic materials used in auto body repair and considerations for automotive painting. Students will explore methods for repairing fiberglass and plastic damage, like welding, reinforcing, repairing holes, and retexturing plastic. Students will be asked to demonstrate the proper use of primers and sealers, spraying techniques, and an understanding of various paint finishes.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Collision Repair; Automotive Body Repair
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum
  • Counts as a directed elective or elective for all diplomas
7380 Collision Repair Capstone
COLL RPR CAP

This course further explores important skills and competencies within the Automotive Body Technology Pathway. Topics such as Automotive Painting Technology, Collision Damage Appraising, and Fiberglass Plastic Repair. Additionally, Co-Op and Internship opportunities will be available for students.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11,12
  • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Collision Repair; Plastic Body Repair and Paint Fundamentals; Automotive Body Repair
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semester required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits max
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas

CTE – Certificate Track Courses:


4512 Applied Business Math
BUS MATH

Applied Business Math is a course designed to prepare students for roles as entrepreneurs, producers, and business leaders by developing abilities and skills that are part of any business environment. A solid understanding of application of money management skills, navigating industry specific technology and apps, establishing and managing budgets, and maintaining inventory for products and other necessary skills that provides the foundation for students interested in careers in business related fields and everyday life. The content includes basic mathematical operations related to accounting, banking and finance, marketing, management, and retail. Instructional strategies should include simulations, guest speakers, tours, Internet research, and business experiences

  • Recommended Grade(s): 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an elective for the Certificate of Completion
  • Fulfills a Mathematics requirement for the Certificate of Completion
  • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course
4540 Applied Personal Financial Responsibility
PRS FIN RSP

Applied Personal Financial Responsibility addresses the identification and management of personal financial resources to meet the financial needs and wants of individuals and families, considering a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, and maintenance factors. This course helps students build and apply skills in financial literacy and responsible decision making. Content includes analyzing personal standards, needs, wants, and goals; identifying sources of income, and navigating technology for money management. A project based approach and applications through authentic settings such as work based observations, service learning experiences and community-based instruction are appropriate. Direct, concrete applications of basic mathematics proficiencies in projects are encouraged.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9,10,11,12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an elective for the Certificate of Completion
  • Qualifies as an Applied Math course for the Certificate of Completion
5330 Applied Adult Roles and Responsibilities
ADULTROLES

Applied Adult Roles and Responsibilities is recommended for all students as life foundations and academic enrichment for students with interest in family and community services, personal and family finance, and similar areas. This course builds knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors that students will need as they complete high school and prepare to take the next steps toward adulthood in today’s society. The course includes the study of interpersonal standards, lifespan roles and responsibilities, individual and family resource management, and financial responsibility and resources. A project or community-based approach that utilizes problem solving skills, communication, leadership, self- determination skills, management processes, and fundamentals to college, career and community membership success. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an elective or Employability Requirement for the Certificate of Completion
5342 Applied Nutrition and Wellness
NTRN WLNS

Applied Nutrition and Wellness is an introductory course valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment. This is a nutrition class that introduces students to only the basics of food preparation so they can become self- sufficient in accessing healthy and nutritious foods. Major course topics include nutrition principles and applications; influences on nutrition and wellness; food preparation, safety, and sanitation; and science, technology, and careers in nutrition and wellness. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, self- determination, and management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of nutrition, food, and wellness. Food preparation experiences are a required component. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an Employability Requirement or elective for the Certificate of Completion
5364 Applied Interpersonal Relationships
INTRP RLT

Applied Interpersonal Relationships is an introductory course that is relevant for students interested in careers that involve interacting with people and for everyday life relationships. This course addresses knowledge and skills needed for positive and productive relationships in career, community, and family settings. Major course topics include communication skills; leadership, self-determination, teamwork, and collaboration; conflict prevention, resolution, and management; building and maintaining relationships; and individual needs and characteristics and their impacts on relationships. A project or community-based approach is recommended in order to apply these topics of interpersonal relationships. This course provides a foundation for all careers and everyday life relationships that involve interacting with people both inside and outside of a business/organization, including team members, clients, patients, customers, the general public, family and friends.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an Employability Requirement or elective for the Certificate of Completion
5366 Applied Human Development and Wellness
HUMAN DEV

Applied Human Development and Wellness is valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment. Course content includes individuals’ physical, social, emotional, and moral development and wellness across the lifespan. Major topics include principles of human development and wellness; impacts of family on human development and wellness; factors that affect human development and wellness; practices that promote human development and wellness; managing resources and services related to human development and wellness; and career exploration in human development and wellness. Life events and contemporary issues addressed in this course include (but are not limited to) change; stress; abuse; personal safety; and relationships among lifestyle choices, health and wellness conditions, and diseases. A project or community-based approach that utilizes problem solving skills, communication, leadership, self-determination skills, and management processes is recommended in order to apply and generalize these skills in authentic settings.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an Employability Requirement or elective for the Certificate of Completion
5394 Applied Preparing for College and Careers
PREP CC

Applied Preparing for College and Careers addresses the knowledge, skills, and behaviors all students need to be prepared for success in college, career, and life. The focus of the course is the impact of

today’s choices on tomorrow’s possibilities. Topics to be addressed include twenty-first century life and career skills; higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes; exploration of personal aptitudes, interests, values, and goals; examining multiple life roles and responsibilities as individuals and family members, planning and building employability skills; transferring school skills to life and work, and managing personal resources. This course includes reviewing the 16 national career clusters and Indiana’s College and Career Pathways, in- depth investigation of one or more pathways, reviewing graduation plans, developing career plans, and developing personal and career portfolios. A project-based approach, including computer and technology applications, cooperative ventures between school and community, simulations, and real life experiences, is recommended.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 9,10,11,12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an elective or Employability for the Certificate of Completion
5974 Applied Work Based Learning Capstone
WBL

Applied Work Based Learning Capstone is an instructional strategy that can be implemented as a stand- alone course or a component of any CTE course that prepares students for college and career. This strategy builds individual students’ skills and knowledge within the area of interest. A standards based training plan is developed by the student, teacher, and workplace mentor to guide the student’s work based learning experiences and assist in evaluating progress and performance, whether WBL is a stand- alone course or a component of a discipline-specific CTE course.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an Employability Requirement, Capstone Course or elective for the Certificate of Completion
0530 Applied Career Exploration Internship
CARR EXP

The Applied Career Exploration Internship course is a paid or unpaid work experience in the public or private sector that provides for workplace learning in an area of student career interest. Unlike a cooperative education program in which students gain expertise in a specific occupation, the career exploration internship is intended to expose students to broad aspects of a particular industry or career cluster area by rotating through a variety of work sites or departments. In addition to their workplace learning activities, students participate in 1) regularly scheduled meetings with their classroom teacher, or 2) a regularly scheduled seminar with the teacher for the purpose of helping students make the connection between academic learning and their work-related experiences. Specific instructional standards tied to the career cluster or pathway and learning objectives for the internship must be written to clarify the expectations of all parties – the student, parent, employer, and instructor.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an Employability Requirement or elective for the Certificate of Completion
  • This course is exploratory in nature and, as such, does not qualify for reimbursement under the career and technical education funding
4528 Applied Digital Applications and Responsibility
DIG APPS RESP

Applied Digital Applications and Responsibility prepares students to use technology in an effective and appropriate manner in school, in a job, or everyday life. Students develop skills related to word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and communications software and may use highly specialized or individualized technology or software. Students learn what it means to be a good digital citizen and how to use technology, including social media, responsibly. Students expand their knowledge of how to use digital devices and software to build decision-making and problem-solving skills. Students may be provided with the opportunity to seek industry-recognized digital literacy certifications.

  • Recommended Grade(s): 11, 12
  • Required Prerequisites: none
  • Recommended Prerequisites: none
  • Credits:
  • Counts as an elective or Employability requirement for the Certificate of Completion

Important NCAA Reminders

The minimum core grade-point average is 2.300 for Division I full qualifier and a 2.200 for Division II full qualifier. The minimum SAT score is 980 (verbal and math sections only) and the minimum ACT sum score is 75 for Division I.   The minimum SAT score is 830 (verbal and math sections only) and the minimum ACT sum score is 61 for Division II.

Sixteen core courses are required for Division I and Division II.

The SAT combined score is based on the verbal and math sections only. The writing section will not be used.

SAT and ACT scores must be reported directly to the Eligibility Center from the testing agency. Scores on transcripts will not be used.  When registering for the SAT or ACT, input the NCAA Eligibility Center code of 9999 to make sure the score is reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center.  Scores on transcripts will not be used.  Once the online registration is complete, the student-athlete must request his/her transcript to be sent to the NCAA through the North Registrar’s office.

Students enrolling at an NCAA Division I or II institution for the first time need to also complete the amateurism questionnaire through the Eligibility Center Web site. Students need to request final amateurism certification prior to enrollment.

For more information regarding the rules visit the Eligibility Center Web site at www.eligibilitycenter.org.

Please call the NCAA Eligibility Center if you have questions: Toll-free number: 877/262-1492.

 

 


 

Play Division I Sports

If you want to compete in NCAA sports at a Division I school, you need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center to make sure you stay on track to meet initial-eligibility standards.

If you have questions about your eligibility or the registration process, call us toll free at 1-877-262-1492. International students should call 317-917-6222.

Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center

Get Ready. Get Set. Go!

Grade 9

  • Ask your counselor for a list of your high school’s NCAA core courses to make sure you take the right classes.

Grade 10

Grade 11

  • Check with your counselor to make sure you will graduate on time with the required number of NCAA core courses.
  • Take the ACT or SAT and submit your scores to the NCAA using code 9999.
  • At the end of the year, ask your counselor to upload your official transcript to the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Grade 12

Division I academic eligibility

To be eligible to compete in NCAA sports during your first year at a Division I school, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

  • Complete 16 core courses:
    • Four years of English
    • Three years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
    • Two years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it)
    • One additional year of English, math or natural/physical science
    • Two years of social science
    • Four additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy
  • Complete 10 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before your seventh semester. Once you begin your seventh semester, you may not repeat or replace any of those 10 courses to improve your core-course GPA.
  • Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in your core courses.
  • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale, which balances your test score and core-course GPA. If you have a low test score, you need a higher core-course GPA to be eligible. If you have a low core-course GPA, you need a higher test score to be eligible.

For more details about the Eligibility Center’s response to COVID-19, click here.

What if I don’t meet the requirements?

If you have not met all the Division I academic requirements, you may not compete in your first year at college. However, if you qualify as an academic redshirt you may practice during your first term in college and receive an athletics scholarship for the entire year.

To qualify as an academic redshirt, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following academic requirements:

  • Complete 16 core courses:
    • Four years of English
    • Three years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
    • Two years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it)
    • One additional year of English, math or natural/physical science
    • Two years of social science
    • Four additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy
  • Earn at least a 2.0 GPA in your core courses.
  • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale.

If you are concerned you may not meet the Division I academic requirements, consider taking the following actions:

  • Ask for advice and accountability from your high school counselor. Check in with the admissions or compliance office at the college you hope to attend.
  • Get tutoring or other study help.
  • Graduate on time. Division I schools allow college-bound student-athletes who graduate on-time to take one core course during the year after they graduate high school.
  • Avoid quick fixes through credit recovery programs. These courses may not be accepted by the NCAA.
  • Keep your coursework. If the NCAA Eligibility Center needs to review your record due to irregularities, you may be asked to provide your coursework.
  • Follow your high school’s policies. The best thing to do is work within the rules.

 

Play Division II Sports

If you want to compete in NCAA sports at a Division II school, you need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center to make sure you stay on track to meet initial-eligibility standards.

If you have questions about your eligibility or the registration process, call us toll free at 1-877-262-1492. International students should call 317-917-6222.

Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center

Get Ready. Get Set. Go!

Grade 9

  • Ask your counselor for a list of your high school’s NCAA core courses to make sure you take the right classes.

Grade 10

Grade 11

  • Check with your counselor to make sure you will graduate on time with the required number of NCAA core courses.
  • Take the ACT or SAT and submit your scores to the NCAA using code 9999.
  • At the end of the year, ask your counselor to upload your official transcript to the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Grade 12

Division II Academic Eligibility

To be eligible to compete in NCAA sports during your first year at a Division II school, you must meet academic requirements for your core courses, grade-point average (GPA) and test scores.

You must graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

  • Complete 16 core courses:
    • Three years of English.
    • Two years of math (Algebra 1 or higher).
    • Two years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it).
    • Three additional years of English, math or natural or physical science
    • Two years of social science
    • Four additional years of English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy
  • Earn at least a 2.2 GPA in your core courses.
  • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA on the Division II sliding scale, which balances your test score and core-course GPA. If you have a low test score, you need a higher core-course GPA to be eligible. If you have a low core-course GPA, you need a higher test score to be eligible.

For more details about the Eligibility Center’s response to COVID-19, click here.

What if I don’t meet the requirements?

If you enroll full-time at a Division II school, and you have not met all the Division II academic requirements, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the requirements to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

  • Complete 16 core courses:
    • Three years of English.
    • Two years of math (Algebra 1 or higher).
    • Two years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it).
    • Three additional years of English, math or natural or physical science
    • Two years of social science
    • Four additional years of English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophyEarn at least a 2.0 GPA in your core courses.
  • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA on the Division II sliding scale.

If you are concerned you may not meet the Division II academic requirements, consider taking the following actions:

  • Ask for advice and accountability from your high school counselor. Check in with the admissions or compliance office at the college you hope to attend.
  • Get tutoring or other study help.
  • Graduate on time. Division I schools allow college-bound student-athletes who graduate on-time to take one core course during the year after they graduate high school.
  • Avoid quick fixes through credit recovery programs. These courses may not be accepted by the NCAA.
  • Keep your coursework. If the NCAA Eligibility Center needs to review your record due to irregularities, you may be asked to provide your coursework.
  • Follow your high school’s policies. The best thing to do is work within the rules.
STUDENT/PARENT FORMS RESOURCE

Please download these forms as needed and submit to the appropriate office.

Network Use Agreement

Parent Permission for Student Driving/Riding/Parking

Parent Volunteer Application

STUDENT AWARDS AND HONORS

AWARDS PRESENTED AT COMMENCEMENT

Tim Sullivan Award

This is an award and one-year scholarship to be given to a senior who has participated in athletics at Terre Haute North Vigo High School.  The recipient must have similar characteristics to those that were exhibited by former student/athlete, Tim Sullivan.  Tim died October 22, 1977, after finishing a cross country race.  The characteristics are the following:

  • Scholastic achievement
  • High moral and ethical character
  • Devotion and loyalty to the team and to the school
  • Serves as an example to others
  • Exhibits a high degree of leadership

Carl S. Riddle Scholars

These individuals are recognized annually for achievements in scholarship, leadership, and school spirit.  The school principal nominates three male and three female applicants for the scholarships to the Carl S. Riddle Trust Fund Committee for selection of recipients. The committee, appointed by the Vigo county school superintendent, also oversees the Carl S. Riddle Trust Fund which funds the annual scholarships.

The Carl S. Riddle Trust Fund was established in 1987 to honor Terre Haute North’s first principal who served from 1971 until retirement in 1987.  The Trust Fund, made possible by generous gifts from both individual and corporate donors, will annually award scholarships in Mr. Riddle’s name to perpetuate his devotion to students, with emphasis on individual achievement and dedication to Terre Haute North.  The presentations awarded at commencement recognize an outstanding male and female student of the graduating class at Terre Haute North as determined by the Trust Fund Committee after reviewing applications and interviewing the candidates.

Athletic Awards

At the close of each of the three seasons, the Athletic Booster Club of North sponsors a program for the participating athletes of that season’s sports.  At each of these programs the numerous athletic awards are announced.  Junior Varsity numerals and certificates and Varsity letters and certificates are presented.

JV AWARDS:

First award – Numerals

Second and subsequent awards – JV Certificates

*Common Criteria for all sports

  1. Successfully complete the JV season
  2. Injured person during the season may be awarded

VARSITY AWARDS:

First award – North Block N letter

Second and subsequent awards – Chevrons

*Common Criteria for all sports

  1. Successfully complete the Varsity season
  2. Certified for IHSAA tournament series
  3. Injured person during the season may be awarded
  4. Seniors may be lettered at discretion of the head coach

**Specific Criteria

  1. Football – participation in at least 20 varsity quarters
  2. Boy’s Basketball – participation in at least20 varsity quarters
  3. Girl’s Basketball – participation in at least 18 varsity quarters
  4. Baseball/Softball – participation in at least one half regular season varsity games
  5. Boy’s/Girl’s Cross Country,

Girl’s Gymnastics, Boy’s/Girl’s

Swimming and Boy’s/Girl’s Track

and Field – participation in at least one-half of regular season meets

  1. Boy’s/Girl’s Golf, Boy’s/Girl’s Soccer,

Boy’s/Girl’s Tennis, Volleyball, and Wrestling – participation in at least one-half of regular season matches

Auxiliary Personnel: (Student managers, student trainers, cheerleaders, and stuntmen

*Common Criteria

  1. Successfully complete the season
  2. Injured person may be awarded by the coach

Student Manager/Trainers:

First Award – Numerals

Second Award – North Block N letter

Third and subsequent awards – Chevrons

Cheerleaders and Stuntmen:

JV Awards

First award – numerals

Second and subsequent awards – JV certificate

Varsity Awards

First award – North Block N letter

Second and subsequent awards – Chevrons

Gold Medal Award

The Gold Medal Award is the highest award that a North athlete may earn.  The Gold Medal selection committee consists of the varsity coach, the athletic director, and the principal.  This committee meets after the last tournament game or meets in which teams or individuals are participating and make the selection to be presented by the Terre Haute North Patriot Booster Club.  Criteria utilized in selecting Gold Medal winners are:

  1. all around performance in the given sport
  2. the contribution to the team by the athlete
  3. the athlete represents the school and community in an admirable   manner
  4. the importance of the individual to the team’s success
  5. exhibits leadership qualities
  6. has demonstrated high moral and ethical characteristics

Music Awards

Each spring the Music Parents provide a banquet for all students who have participated in music programs at North.  The highlight of the banquet is the presentation of awards.

Music Department Letters         

The music department awards letters to music students who contribute to the performing arts at Terre Haute North and show dedication beyond the required classes.  Music department letters are awarded to each student earning a total of 12 points through music department activities.

Points earned for each music activity are as follows:

Points    Music Department Activity1 Each trimester of enrollment in a music performance

1     All-State Band, Choir, and/or Orchestra

1     Jazz Band

1     Jazz Ensemble

1     Pep Band

1     Winter Guard

1     Winter Drums

1     Musical (Cast, Student director, Crew chief, or pit orchestra)

½    Madrigal Choir

½    String Chamber Ensembles

½    District ISSMA Solo & Ensemble solo or small ensemble

½    State ISSMA Solo & Ensemble solo or small ensemble

½    District ISSMA Solo & Ensemble Group I large ensemble

½    State ISSA Solo & Ensemble large ensemble

Senior Music Award

The music department has traditionally recognized students who have supported the Terre Haute North music program.  A token of the music department’s appreciation is presented at the Music Awards Banquet to seniors enrolled at least 11 trimesters in music classes at Terre Haute North and are enrolled in music concurrently in their last trimester.

AFJROTC Letters

Air Force Junior ROTC cadets may earn school letters by contributing to Terre Haute North Vigo High School activities, providing community service as a JROTC cadet, participating in Color Guard, Drill Team and Raider competitions while reflecting dedication beyond the required class work.  Cadets earn AFJROTC letters by earning a total of 8 points through AFJROTC activities.

Points earned for each AFJROTC activity are as follows:

Points             Activity

1                 Each Drill Team performance for the school or community

1                 Each Color Guard, Drill Team or Raider Competition

1                 Major Community Service Events such as the Veteran’s Day Parade and Operation Christmas

½                Each trimester of enrollment in AFJROTC with a “B” or above average

½                Each Color Guard Presentation at football, basketball, track or community event

½                Participation in Kitty Hawk Air Society Club

½                Participation in Rocketry Club

National Honor Society

The Terre Haute North Vigo Chapter of the National Honor Society was chartered in 1972.  The objectives of this organization are to create an enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate a desire to render service, to promote worthy leadership, and to encourage the development of character in Terre Haute North students.  Eligibility to candidate for membership into the National Honor Society is determined based upon the following criteria:

  1. Attendance – the equivalent of one semester at North Vigo
  2. Scholarship – Applications will be offered to all students who, at the end of their sophomore year, have a cumulative GPA of 3.3 and are on track to earn, at a minimum, a CORE 40 diploma
  3. Service – Each student must have been involved in at least 3 service projects in school or the community
  4. Leadership – the student must have demonstrated leadership within the school or community
  5. Character – the student must be of good character as determined in part by the following criteria.
    • Positive Behavior: No record of skipping classes or of knowingly violating school regulations.  No record of civil offenses.
    • Integrity: No recorded incidents of cheating or intentional dishonesty.
    • Cooperation: Willingness to assist classmates, faculty, staff, and others.
    • Ethical choices: The student strives to do the “right” thing.

Membership is not automatically awarded.  Candidates and members are expected to maintain minimum standards for scholarship, leadership, service and character to remain in good standing.  Failure to be selected into the National Honor Society is not a deprivation of a right and due process is not applicable in such situations.

Candidates who meet the scholastic guideline are invited to submit a request for nomination to the faculty committee.  The faculty committee reviews candidates’ activity report form according to the above National Honor Society guidelines to determine selection.

While selection into the National Honor Society is a privilege, any member who resigns or is dismissed shall return the emblem and membership card and never again be eligible for induction.   (An appeals process for dismissals is available.)  Induction for eligible sophomores, juniors and seniors takes place in the spring to enable members to include National Honor Society on college applications.

Fraternitas Summae Excellentiae

The top five percent scholastically of the graduating class is honored by automatic membership in the Fraternitas Summae Excellentiae (the Fraternity of Highest Excellence); inclusion of qualified foreign exchange students into the Fraternity of Highest Excellence will not eliminate any qualified resident students.  Students achieving this honor are presented with honor cords to be worn at commencement.

ALTERNATIVES to REGULAR SCHOOL ENROLLMENT

Enrollment in College Courses

Eligible juniors and seniors may, with the approval of their principal, enroll in an accredited public or private college or university and earn credits toward high school graduation as well as college credit.  Courses may be approved if they are not offered by the high school and if they are comparable to courses listed by the State Board of Education as applicable toward high school graduation.  A student’s enrollment in such a program may not delay progress toward graduation or cause a high school course of similar nature to be cancelled due to lack of enrollment.  The amount of credit earned is directed by the state:  1/2 high school credit for 1 or 2 college credit hours; 1, high school credit for 3 or 4 college credit hours;  2 high school credits

for 5 college credit hours.  High schools will accept the grade reported from the college/university, or a mark of “P” for any grade above an “F” and a mark of “F” for a grade of “F”; the choice of grade or “P/F” will be the students.   Credit earned in this fashion will be so indicated on the student transcript.  All costs associated with college enrollment are the sole responsibility of the student.

Correspondence Instruction

Students who need to make up a credit may take a course by correspondence through IU Virtual or an approved online institution.  Students may see their counselors for more details.

Homebound Instruction

Group homebound services may be provided with up to four students in a group. Most groups will meet at either North or South High Schools on designated evenings.  Individual homebound services will be an exception and in rare cases (i.e. students must be immobile or confined to the home).

WORK PERMITS

Students requiring work permits must secure an “Intention to Employ” form.  Beginning in July 2021 forms will be filled out by the employer online.  The school is no longer involved in the process.

STUDENT WORKER POLICY

Students who wish to be student workers may apply utilizing this method:

  1. Juniors and seniors may sign up in January of the previous year during the course scheduling process.
  2. Eligibility is determined on the following criteria:
  • No more than two Tuesday extensions.
  • No out-of-school suspensions.
  • No more than five absences during the previous semester.
  • No less than a 2.0 grade point average.
  • No truancies from class or school

FINANCIAL AID and SCHOLARSHIPS

The present philosophy regarding paying for a college education is that it is the responsibility of the parent and student.  When these resources are insufficient, financial aid is available based on the financial need of the family.  Financial aid is usually offered as a package which includes scholarships, grants, work study, and loans.

The following steps need to be taken in applying for financial aid:

  • The student should apply for admission to the college(s) that he/she wishes to attend.
  • Financial aid officers will not consider any application for financial aid unless the student has applied for admission and is accepted.
  • The student should file a financial aid request form from the college.
  • Parents must file a financial need statement, usually the Free Application for Federal

Student Aid (FAFSA), where one indicates which school(s) should receive the report.

The FAFSA is sent to the College Scholarship Service where a needs analysis is performed using a standard formula.  College Scholarship Service sends the information to the colleges and programs from which a student is seeking aid.

Some scholarships are not based on need.  These include The Indiana State University Academic Scholarship, the Voice of Democracy Scholarship, the Soil and Water Conservation Scholarship, the Tri Kappa Scholarship, the Elks Most Valuable Student Scholarship, Wal-Mart Scholarships, and many, many more.  Scholarship information is available in the Counseling Office.  Scholarships are announced and posted through various means.